Oklahoma Historical Society
800 Nazih Zuhdi Drive
Oklahoma City OK 73105-7917
Tax Exempt Status Exempt-Other
Mission Statement The mission of the Oklahoma Historical Society is to collect, preserve, and share the history and culture of the state of Oklahoma and its people.
Contact Information
Contact Name Bob Blackburn
Contact email scrynes@okhistory.org
Address 800 Nazih Zuhdi Drive
Oklahoma City, OK 73105 7917
Phone (405) 522-6676
Fax 405-521-2492
County Oklahoma County
Alternate Phone 405 522-0317
How to Give
Donate to Endowment http://occf.org/ohs/
Other ways to donate, support or volunteer
Each year the Oklahoma Historical Society conducts an Annual Giving Campaign.  Contributions to the OHS for the campaign are tax deductible and provide vitally important funds that help keep the Oklahoma History Center operating at the level of excellence that our Smithsonian and National Archives affiliation require.  Donors may mail in their donations or call (405)522-0317 to donate over the phone.  Donors may also donate items or collections to the Museum or the Research Center.
 
Passionate about Oklahoma history? Enjoy sharing that passion? You should think about volunteering at the  Oklahoma History Center. Volunteers are the smiling faces greeting every visitor at the front door. They answer questions in the galleries and lead students on tours. Volunteers help in many behind-the-scenes activities every day and they are vital to our success.
 
 
Financial Summary
 
 
Projected Revenue $15,878,935.00
Projected Expenses $15,516,552.00
History and Background
Former Names
NameYear
N/A
Year Founded 1893
IRS Ruling Year
Statements
Mission The mission of the Oklahoma Historical Society is to collect, preserve, and share the history and culture of the state of Oklahoma and its people.
Background

The Oklahoma Historical Society was founded in 1893 by members of the Oklahoma Territory Press Association to collect newspapers documenting the first draft of Oklahoma history. In 1895, the OHS was incorporated under the laws of the territorial legislature, and in 1907 the OHS became a state-supported institution with a strong private membership component. In 2005, the OHS moved into the new Oklahoma istory Center. In addition to participating in and fully supporting the overall mission of the OHS to preserve and perpetuate the history of Oklahoma and its people by collecting, interpreting and disseminating knowledge of Oklahoma and the Southwest, he Oklahoma History Center collects, preserves and interprets the complete history of Oklahoma for everyone. The museum fulfills its mission through the application of the highest standards of collections care, the presentation of diverse in-house and traveling exhibits, and multi-disciplinary educational programs. Many of the programs and exhibits of the OHS have been accomplished through previous funding from the NEH and the NEA. Over the years OHS has developed numerous collections and programs and now has 32 museums and historic sites throughout Oklahoma.

Impact
During the last year, the Oklahoma Historical Society accomplished many of its goals, but among the most significant are the following:
 
Top 3 accomplishments are:  1) Secured $1.7 million in funding for and opened the Crossroads of Commerce Exhibit; 2) Opened new Honey Springs Battlefield Museum; and 3) through grant funding we were able to give 17,500 students and teachers free admission to the Oklahoma History Center and related educational programming.
 
Top 3 goals:  1) Raising continued funds for exhibits; 2) Raising funds for a living history farm at the George M. Murrell Home; and 3) Raising funds for educational programming. 
Needs
The Oklahoma Historical Society would prioritize its needs starting with the following:
 
1) Funding for deferred maintenance; 2) Funding for operations; 3) Funding for Oklahoma Museum of Popular Culture; 4) Endowment to support salaries of employees of the Oklahoma Historical Society; and 5) Funding for continued support of exhibits and programming.
Area Served
Area Served
Geographic Area Served
Oklahoma - Statewide
Geographically, the OHS programs touch every part of the state.  Recently, the population and geographic area served has extended beyond state borders via traveling exhibits and World Wide Web-based information networks. 
Service Categories
Secondary Organizational Category Arts,Culture & Humanities/Historical Societies & Historic Preservation
Tertiary Organizational Category Arts,Culture & Humanities/History Museums
Programs
Description
The Research Center is the repository of books, archival materials, and family research records relating to Oklahoma.  The Research Center collections contain approximately 30 million pags of newspapers, 4 million documents on Indian history, 6000 manuscript collections, 7 million photographs, 10000 maps, and vital statistics on families for most counties in the state.  Catalogs for the Research Center collections are available online, as are various databases and indexes.
 
Research Center collections are accessible through the research library.  Microfilm readers and computers with free in-library connections to genealogical and historical research websites are available for patron use.  Photocopying and duplication services are available for a fee, as is research assistance by mail.
Strategy
Population Served General/Unspecified
Program Short-term SuccessHelpDescription of short-term achievement(s) or improvement(s) that will result from this program.
Short term success relies on continuing to build collections and properly preserving them for future generations, while providing access to the materials in whatever form is currently available (microfilm, digital versions, or original documents).
 
Program Long-term SuccessHelpDescription of the ultimate change(s) that will result from this program. This may be far into the future or represent an ideal state.
The overall long-term goal of the Research Center is to Collect, Preserve and share the History of Oklahoma with the State and the world.  The Research Center is extremely active in maximizing the sharing portion of our goal with digital projects designed to provide internet access to collections that would otherwise require a visit to the History Center.  Our goal is to allow researchers digital copies of materials online and thus increase the number of patrons who can utilize the wonderful collections deposited at the Oklahoma Historical Society.
Program Success MonitoringHelpDescription of the tools used to measure or track program impact.
The Oklahoma Historical Society is led and monitored by Executive Director Bob Blackburn and Deputy Director Tim Zwink who report to the OHS Board of Directors on a regular basis.  The Research Center is led and monitored by Director William Welge and Deputy Director Chad Williams.  Individual department leaders are evaluated on the efficient output of specific projects assigned and personnel are monitored using State of Oklahoma yearly PMP forms.
Examples of Program SuccessHelpSpecific examples of changes in behaviors or testimonies of changes that demonstrate program success.
The Gateway to Oklahoma History (http://gateway.okhistory.org/) is an OHS online repository of Oklahoma history.  You may browse through hundreds of thousands of newspaper pages dating from the 1840s to the 1920s.  The Gateway will be the largest repository of Oklahoma newspapers online.  Within two years 5 million pages of Oklahoma newspapers will be word searchable and free of any charges.
 
Additional Online Projects completed and available on the OHS website:
 
1890 Oklahoma Territorial Census Index
1896 Applications for Enrollment
1901 Land Lottery Participants (partial)
Dawes Final Rolls
Deaths found in OKC City Directories 1918, 1920-23
Divorce records from Oklahoma County
Oklahoman Obituary Index
Oklahoma Military Deaths - WWI, WWII, Korea, Vietnam
Oklahoma County Marriage Records
Probate Records from Oklahoma County, 1890-1928
School Reports Dawes Commission Records
Smith's First Directory of Oklahoma Territory
Vertical Files
 
 
 
Description
The Oklahoma History Center (OHC) is a division of the Oklahoma Historical Society (OHS).  In addition to participating in and fully supporting the overall mission of the OHS, the OHC will collect, preserve and interpret the complete history of Oklahoma.  The OHC will fulfill its mission through the application of the highest standards of collections care, the presentation of diverse in-house and traveling exhibits, and multi-disciplinary educational programs.  In addition to its primary focus on Oklahoma history, the OHC may provide exhibits and education programs representative of a wider cultural context.  The OHC will collect, preserve and interpret artifacts and materials relevant to the histories, societies and cultures of all the diverse peoples of Oklahoma, including contemporary societies.  Service, fiscal responsibility, and institutional excellence will be standards applied to all elements of OHC operations.
Strategy
Population Served General/Unspecified
Program Short-term SuccessHelpDescription of short-term achievement(s) or improvement(s) that will result from this program.
Program success may be measured in increased visitor and audience participation thereby enriching the lives of all the participants of the state as a whole.  Particular impacts may be expected for thousands of school and students groups and, by extension, their families.  Further, through these efforts, local, regional, and state economic impacts are expected due to tourism dollars and cultural tourism efforts.  More difficult to measure, but still important, is building an awareness and sense of pride in state residents and tourist visitors of the many impacts and extensive contributions of the state and its people.
Program Long-term SuccessHelpDescription of the ultimate change(s) that will result from this program. This may be far into the future or represent an ideal state.
The OHC preserves the history of all the peoples of the state.  Included in these efforts are artifacts representing people, places and events as well as archival records, documents, oral histories and historic film recordings.  The collections, preservation, and sharing of the history of all the state's peoples is expected to continue for the foreseeable future and includes the goal of increasing annual average impact of the OHC to 250,000 people per year.
Program Success MonitoringHelpDescription of the tools used to measure or track program impact.
Program success may be measured through attendance and participation in all aspects of OHC programs, events, and endeavors.  Another indicator will be success in generating private donations and earned revenue to support exhibits and programs.  Another indicator of success will be found in the numbers of donations of artifacts and archival materials documenting and describing the history of the state and its peoples.  All of the above are directly quantifiable and may be measured over time and compared to multi-year records.
Examples of Program SuccessHelpSpecific examples of changes in behaviors or testimonies of changes that demonstrate program success.
Since opening to the public in November, 2005, the OHC has provided education programs, exhibits, research and other services to 1.4 million people.  Student participation averages over 50,000 students per year.  Collection donations average over 1,500 artifacts per year.  Since opening, the OHC has generated roughly 4.6 million dollars in earned revenue to support education, staff, and programs.  Another measure of success and distinction is that the OHC is an affiliate of the Smithsonian Instiution.  Of the over 17,000 museums in the nation only about 140 are Smithsonian affiliates.  Another measure of success is that even in difficult state budget years, the OHC has very broad and vocal support from the Governor's Office, House of Representatives and State Senate, a well as all state national level representatives.
Description
The Museums and Historic Sites Division of the Oklahoma Historical Society (OHS) operates thirty facilities across the state.  The program works to further the mission of the OHS to collect, preserve, and share.  The program preserves historic sites and material culture (the objects that mark our individual and collective state heritage) and provides public access to the heritage of our state through public programs and exhibits.
Strategy
Population Served General/Unspecified
Program Short-term SuccessHelpDescription of short-term achievement(s) or improvement(s) that will result from this program.
Each exhibit or program has its own learning goals established before a project begins development.  These goals are the guide for development.  Each successful program or exhibit is a stepping stone to the long term goals of overwhelming public support for the maintenance and development of our hsitorical resources.
Program Long-term SuccessHelpDescription of the ultimate change(s) that will result from this program. This may be far into the future or represent an ideal state.
The ultimate success for the program will be a stable network of OHS museums and historic sites with adequate repair, maintenance and program funds.  This will ensure the long-term preservation of the valuable heritage in our care.  The success of the program will also be measured by the level of public engagement in the programs and activities offered.
Program Success MonitoringHelpDescription of the tools used to measure or track program impact.
Attendance, participation and engagement are the key elements to monitoring success.  Attendance is determined by actual count.  Participation and engagement are monitored by observing visitors at programs and in exhibits to determine what is working and what needs to change.  Random visitors are asked to complete short questionnaires about programs and exhibits, and volunteers at the front desk and in the galleries are key to reporting what visitors tell them.
Examples of Program SuccessHelpSpecific examples of changes in behaviors or testimonies of changes that demonstrate program success.
Annual statistics: attendance 156,073; volunteer hours 36,778; programs 1,099; program attendance 38,774; school groups 824; number of students 38,774; in-kind contributions $49,129; cash donations $137,564; and earned income $533,533.
 
Many results of the program are hard to track, but anecdotal information exemplifies the potential impact:
 
A student who participated in a program became interested in history, gained a prominent position withing the Obama administration and is responsible for the funding for a new visitor's center at a battlefield.
 
A teacher wrote of one program, "This program has a reputation that captures the attention of our kindergarteners through third graders.  Fifth graders share their Rose Hill experiences with 4th grade students.  Parents actually delay school transfers to ensure their child will get to attend in 4th grade.  Many parents travel with us because they attended as children.  It is eagerly anticipated by all."
Description
The SHPO, in partnership with the National Park Service, carries out the federal historic preservation programs for the State of Oklahoma.  These include nomination of eligible properties to the National Register of Historic Places and provision of education and training programs.  Under our National Register program, we want to increase the number of Oklahoma's registered properties associated with under-represented groups, including African-Americans, Asians, Hispanics, and women.  Additionally, we offer training programs and education programs for university students considering careers in the broad field of historic preservation.
Strategy
Population Served General/Unspecified
Program Short-term SuccessHelpDescription of short-term achievement(s) or improvement(s) that will result from this program.
The most immediate results of these activities will include listing of nominated properties in the National Register of Historic Places within one year of funding which automatically extends recognition, limited protection, and certain financial benefits (in some cases).  The training program for local preservation officials will result in improvement of their performance as staff or members of local historic preservation commissions, and this improvement can be demonstrated through the quality of rehabilitation work on local projects subject to their review.  The student scholarship program's success in the near-term will be determined by the number of follow-up contacts from students with three such contacts with the SHPO considered success.
Program Long-term SuccessHelpDescription of the ultimate change(s) that will result from this program. This may be far into the future or represent an ideal state.
The SHPO's programs are tools for community revitalization, and listing in the National Register positions property owners to qualify for special tax incentives, grants, and heritage tourism benefits.  Results of listing can be tracked through records of certified rehabilitations and review of federal projects on file at the SHPO.  The long term success of training for local officials will be based on additional communities joining the SHPO's Certified Local Governments Program and on rehabilitation work approved by local officials meeting the Secretary of the Interior's Standards for Rehabilitation, both tracked through the SHPO's regular performance reviews of CLGs.  The student scholarships will have long-lasting results demonstrated by increased numbers of qualified professionals to work in Oklahoma as consultants or as employees of public and private sector entities, documented on the basis of contacts with the SHPO from those hiring preservation professionals.
Program Success MonitoringHelpDescription of the tools used to measure or track program impact.
Because all National Register nominations for Oklahoma properties are processed through the SHPO, we will measure program success through the number of new National Register listings for the state and numbers of certified rehabilitations each year.  SHPO records, including its annual End of Year Report to the National Park Service, will provide the tools for measuring success.  We will measure success of local officials training through the number of cities that join the Certified Local Governments Program and through the regular performance evaluation of each CLG.  Success of the student scholarship program will be measured by the numbers of those who are added to the SHPO's consultants list and who are employed by public and private sector entities with preservation-related responsibilities.
Examples of Program SuccessHelpSpecific examples of changes in behaviors or testimonies of changes that demonstrate program success.
The success of historic preservation in the state is detailed in Economic Impacts of Historic Preservation, released in 2009.  The Center for Urban Policy Research, Rutgers University, completed the study.  It examined the direct and indirect impacts of historic preservation activities in Oklahoma for the year 2007 and concluded that they totaled $357 million for the period (rehabilitation/$125 million; heritage tourism/$175 million; and Main Street/$57 million), providing evidence of the significance of historic preservation to a community's economy and its quality of life.  Listing buildings in the National Register is a critical tool in the preservation process, as are strong local preservation programs and qualified professionals to assist property owners.
CEO/Executive Director
CEO/Executive Director Bob Blackburn
Start Date Jan 1980
Email bblackburn@okhistory.org
Experience
1974-1978: Teaching Assistant and Instructor, Department of History, Oklahoma State University
1977-1978: Assistant Director Comprehensive Historic Sites Survey, Oklahoma State University
1978-1979: Director Commercial Historic Sites Survey of Oklahoma City
1979-present: President Cottonwood Publications/Consulting
1979-1999: Editor of The Chronicles of Oklahoma
1989: Interim Director of Archives and Manuscripts Division Oklahoma Historical Society
1990-1999: Deputy Executive Director, Oklahoma Historical Society
Staff
Number of Full-time Staff 141
Number of Part-time Staff 60
Number of Contract Staff 1
Number of Volunteers 159
Staff Retention Rate 93
Are professional development opportunities provided? Yes
Does CEO/Executive Director have formal evaluations? Yes
Management reports to board? Yes
Organizational Plans
Fundraising Plan Yes
Policy against commission-based compensation for fundraising consultant Yes
Communication Plan Yes
Strategic Plan Yes
Number of Years Strategic Plan Considers 1
Date Strategic Plan Adopted Apr 2016
Management Succession Plan No
Organization Policies and Procedures Yes
Risk Management Provisions
Commercial General Insurance
Board Chair
Name Dr. William Corbett
Company Affiliation Retired
Term Apr 2016 to Apr 2018
Email wcorbet@att.net
Board of Directors
List Current as of Aug 15, 2016
Board of Directors List
NameAffiliationStatus
Mr. Jack D. Baker Self-employed CPAVoting
Mrs. Sherry L. Beasley Interior ImagesVoting
Mr. John Cary Voting
Dr. William Corbett RetiredVoting
Mr. Frederick F. Drummond Drummond Cattle CompanyVoting
Ms. Cheryl Evans Northern Oklahoma CollegeVoting
Dr. Deena Fisher Northwestern Oklahoma State UniversityVoting
Mrs. Billie Fogarty Voting
Ms. Karen Keith Tulsa County CommissionerVoting
Mrs. Martha A. Lippert RetiredVoting
Mr. Leonard Logan Logan & Lowry Law FirmVoting
Mr. Guy Logsdon Historian and AuthorVoting
Dr. Patricia Loughlin University of Central OklahomaVoting
Mrs. Sherry Muchmore Voting
Mrs. Shirley Ann Nero RetiredVoting
Ms. Sandra Olson HistorianVoting
Mr. Bill Settle RetiredVoting
Mrs. Donna Sharpe Voting
Mr. Kenneth Sivard James Hodge Auto GroupVoting
Mr. Lewis Stiles RetiredVoting
Mr. Charles Tate Voting
Mrs. Barbara Thompson Community VolunteerVoting
Mr. James R. Waldo Mock, Schwabe, Waldo, Elder, Reeves & Bryant Law FirmVoting
Governance
Board Term Lengths 3 years
Percentage of Board Making Monetary Contributions to the Organization 100 %
Percentage of Board Making In-Kind Contributions to the Organization 100 %
Board Orientation Yes
Constituency Includes Client Representation Yes
Written Board Selection Criteria? Yes
Standing Committees
Development / Fund Development / Fund Raising / Grant Writing / Major Gifts
Executive
Collections
Nominating
Current Fiscal Year
Fiscal Year July 01, 2016-June 30, 2017
Current Year Budgeted Total Income $15,878,935
Current Year Budgeted Total Expenses $15,516,552
IRS Letter of Determination
Prior Three Years' Financial History
Revenue and ExpensesHelpFinancial data for prior years is entered by foundation staff based on the documents submitted by nonprofit organizations.Foundation staff members enter this information to assure consistency in the presentation of financial data across all organizations.
Fiscal Year201620152014
Total Revenue$15,878,935$17,547,257$18,346,732
Total Expenses$15,516,552$16,890,749$17,793,720
Revenue Less Expenses$362,383$656,508$553,012
Revenue SourcesHelpThe financial analysis involves a comparison of the IRS Form 990 and the audit report (when available) and revenue sources may not sum to total based on reconciliation differences. Revenue from foundations and corporations may include individual contributions when not itemized separately.
Fiscal Year201620152014
Contributions------
Foundation and
Corporation Contributions
$441,379$440,251$390,753
Government Contributions$13,375,282$14,813,084$15,669,940
Federal$1,121,402$1,208,616$1,039,422
State$12,253,880$13,604,468$14,630,518
Local------
Unspecified------
Individual Contributions------
------
$1,171,076$1,322,358$1,303,048
Investment Income, Net of Losses$20,478$20,486$21,168
Unrealized Gain/Loss------
Membership Dues$322,362$326,892$347,190
Special Events$313,471$356,019$390,093
Revenue In-Kind------
Other$234,887$268,167$224,540
Expense Allocation
Fiscal Year201620152014
Program Expense$14,289,242$15,631,310$16,506,816
Administration Expense$1,119,174$1,156,861$1,187,132
Fundraising Expense$108,136$102,578$99,772
Payments to Affiliates------
Total Revenue/Total Expenses1.021.041.03
Program Expense/Total Expenses92%93%93%
Fundraising Expense/Contributed Revenue1%1%1%
Assets and Liabilities
Fiscal Year201620152014
Total Assets$73,595,074$72,520,980$71,236,340
Current Assets$2,225,721$2,339,546$2,351,007
Long-Term Liabilities------
Current Liabilities$17,178$52,597$65,557
Total Net Assets$73,577,896$72,468,383$71,170,783
Solvency
Short Term Solvency
Fiscal Year201620152014
Current Ratio: Current Assets/Current Liabilities129.5744.4835.86
Long Term Solvency
Fiscal Year201620152014
Long-Term Liabilities/Total Assets0%0%0%
Funding Sources
Top Funding Sources
Fiscal Year201620152014
Top Funding Source & Dollar AmountGovt - State $12,253,880Govt - State $13,604,468Govt - State $14,630,518
Second Highest Funding Source & Dollar AmountEarned Revenue $1,171,076Earned Revenue $1,322,358Earned Revenue $1,303,048
Third Highest Funding Source & Dollar AmountGovt - Fed $1,121,402Govt - Fed $1,208,616Govt - Fed $1,039,422
Endowment? Yes
Endowment Spending Policy Percentage
Endowment Spending Policy Percentage (if selected) 5 %
Credit Line? No
Reserve Fund? No
Capital Campaign
Currently in a Capital Campaign? No
Capital Campaign Anticipated in Next Five Years? Yes
Comments on Financials
Foundation Staff Comments
All prior years' financial information is from compilations. 
 
The organization is audited once every four years by the Oklahoma State Auditor and Inspector. The most recent audit is available here on GiveSmartOKC. 
 
Organizations with a GiveSmartOKC profile are responsible for updating information annually within 45 days following the end of their fiscal year.
 
Address 800 Nazih Zuhdi Drive
Oklahoma City, OK 73105 7917
Primary Phone 405 522-6676
Contact Email scrynes@okhistory.org
Give to Endowment http://occf.org/ohs/
CEO/Executive Director Bob Blackburn
Board Chair Dr. William Corbett
Board Chair Company Affiliation Retired