Neighborhood Services Organization, Inc.
411 SW 11th
Oklahoma City OK 73109-9406
Tax Exempt Status Public Supported Charity
Organization Does Business As (DBA) Name(s)
Organization DBA
NSO
Mission Statement Transforming lives and encouraging independence through safe, healthy homes, dental care and nutrition.
At NSO, homeless families have caring support in their safe, clean home while they gain the skills and resources they need to live independently.
Contact Information
Contact Name Stacey Ninness
Contact email nso@nsookc.org
Address 411 SW 11th
Oklahoma City, OK 73109 9406
Phone (405) 236-0452
Fax 405-236-1871
County OK
Alternate Phone 405 236-0413
How to Give
Donate with Credit Card http://www.nsookc.org
Donate to Endowment http://occf.org/nso/
Other ways to donate, support or volunteer Childcare Assistant
Watch over and interact with our Martha’s House and Gatewood children while mothers attend a weekly life skills class on Tuesdays from 6:00-7:15 pm. Childcare assistants can also be on call to watch children while their mother attends a job interview during the day

Meal Sharing
Prepare and deliver a meal or cook onsite for the residents at the Carolyn Williams Center or Palo Duro programs. This opportunity is very flexible and always needed!

Apartment Sponsor
Volunteers can paint, prepare, decorate and lightly furnish apartments for homeless families moving into one of our transitional housing facilities. Apartment sponsors continue to provide basic necessities (bedding, towels, cleaning supplies, kitchen items, etc.) on an as-needed basis. Ideal for groups.

Lunch buddies
Take some time during a lunch break to be a friend to one of our residents at Palo Duro, a permanent supportive living center for homeless, single adults with a mental illness. Our residents love to interact with volunteers. Eat lunch, play a card game or enjoy a conversation.

Teach life skills
Our clients need to learn skills that will help them transition to independence. Skills such as cooking, budgeting, applying for a job, maintaining a home and maintaining healthy relationships can be taught to residents of our housing programs.

Seasonal
Help our clients celebrate upcoming holidays and birthdays. Projects are based on the volunteer or group’s interest and availability.

Bible Study
Help clients feel uplifted and inspired each week by leading Bible study at Palo Duro I or Palo Duro II permanent housing programs. Days and times are flexible.

Financial Summary
 
 
Projected Revenue $2,567,695.00
Projected Expenses $2,479,530.00
History and Background
Former Names
NameYear
NA
Year Founded 1969
IRS Ruling Year 1970
State Registration Expiration Apr 2017
Statements
Mission Transforming lives and encouraging independence through safe, healthy homes, dental care and nutrition.
Background

Neighborhood Services Organization (NSO) is a faith-based non-profit social services agency providing housing and healthcare opportunities for low-income and at-risk individuals and families in the Oklahoma City area.

Founded in 1920 by Methodist women, who named their new venture Wesley Community House, the primary focus was on the Riverside neighborhood in south Oklahoma City. The founders sought to make a positive difference in the lives of impoverished, post-WWI families, many of which were immigrant families. In 1946, an additional community center location was added in northeast Oklahoma City to serve African-American families. In 1969, these two entities joined with Neighborhood Centers, Inc. a non-profit organization with multiple locations in the metro area. After the merger they became one entity: Neighborhood Services Organization, which is commonly called “NSO.” 

As NSO has evolved it has been creative in the way it assists low-income Oklahoma City residents, always willing to change as society’s needs dictated. Several NSO programs have been spun off as separate and highly successful non-profits: Detox Center, Regional Food Bank, Mobile Meals and Positive Tomorrows.     

Today, our focus is on: (1) Helping homeless persons and those at risk of homelessness−from youths to seniors−secure housing or keep from losing their current homes; (2) Providing uninsured citizens with access to quality low-cost dental care; and, (3) Delivering nutrition education information, counseling and supplemental foods to young mothers during the critical phases of infant growth and development. Last year, our eight program sites recorded a combined 72,000 client visits.
Impact
ACCOMPLISHMENTS:
 
Capital Campaign
In 2015 we completed our first-ever capital campaign. This $2.5M campaign was a success. The funding we secured will help us better meet the needs of our clients by efficiently maximizing our resources.
 
Dental Services Expanded
Our low-cost dental clinic is one of the community's greatest assets. Hiring a dental hygienist and maximizing our resources has allowed us to increase our dental services to uninsured Oklahomans 33% from 2014 to 2015.
 
Infrastructure
We recently procured a comprehensive client case manager software package. This will help us in several critical areas: service to our clients will be more systematic and better coordinated, we will have the ability to track client outcomes across service platforms, and we will have the ability to comprehensively analyze massive amounts of data.
 
New Headquarters
In 2015 we moved into a new building that is home to our administrative offices, and our WIC and Dental Clinics. We now have many of our services centrally located which allows us to better serve our community. We are grateful and excited about this beautiful space and the opportunity to serve our clients and community.
 
Website updated
Our website was "remodeled" in 2016. Our website is fresh and information is easy to locate for all constituents: clients, donors, volunteers, partners, and community members.
 
Increase community awareness of NSO
Despite being around for nearly a century and serving some 72,000 people each year, the community is still not aware of NSO. While we have improved, we recognize there is much work to be done.
Needs

1. Comprehensive wrap-around services integration: $75,000

2. Dental outreach and screenings at high-risk local schools: $35,000

3. Furniture for transitional and permanent housing programs: $50,000

4. Maintenance for housing facilities: $50,000

5. Housing for young men who have aged out of OK Foster Care: $150,000

CEO/Executive Director Statement
NSO is unique in services we provide - both in the type of services provided and the broad scope of services.
 
We are not a homeless shelter. Instead, we provide temporary and permanent housing solutions to people who are homeless or at risk of imminent homelessness.
 
Our programs are not just a short-term "band-aid" fix, we offer solutions that will lead to life-long self-sufficiency.
 
We have eight properties around the city to best meet our clients' needs. This is an exciting agency, impacted 72,000 community members last year.
 
 
Area Served
Area Served
Geographic Area Served
Central Oklahoma
Oklahoma City Metropolitan Statistical Area (all 7 counties)
Oklahoma - Statewide
We provide services regardless of location of residence -- however, more than 99% of those we serve live in the OKC metro area.
Service Categories
Secondary Organizational Category Health Care/Community Clinics
Tertiary Organizational Category Housing, Shelter/Housing Support
Programs
Description WIC provides supplemental foods, health care referrals and nutrition education to low-income, pregnant and postpartum women as well as to infants and children up to age five who are found to be at nutritional risk. Every month, some 5,500 women and their children benefit from NSO's WIC programs. Our two WIC clinics provide no-cost supplemental foods and nutritional education during a critical phase of growth and development.
Strategy
Population Served Females Children and Youth (0 - 19 years)
Program Short-term SuccessHelpDescription of short-term achievement(s) or improvement(s) that will result from this program. Better nutrition, better health, children more likely to be on-track developmentally when early nutrition needs are met, reduction of preventable birth defects, increased safety, hunger prevention, healthy pregnancies, infant health, increase in breastfeeding rates and length of time infants are breastfed.
Program Long-term SuccessHelpDescription of the ultimate change(s) that will result from this program. This may be far into the future or represent an ideal state. Ultimate change is long-term impact on the public health of the Oklahoma City area community. Served some 60,000 area residents through our programs.
Program Success MonitoringHelpDescription of the tools used to measure or track program impact. The WIC program has very specific guidelines and reporting structures through the Dept of Agriculture, which funds the program. These include number of people served, participation in education nutrition classes, breastfeeding rates and duration, as well as other outcomes.
Examples of Program SuccessHelpSpecific examples of changes in behaviors or testimonies of changes that demonstrate program success. NSO's WIC Clinics have traditionally received the highest possible ratings for outcomes and effective management. In fact, our WIC Clinics were deemed "model programs" that other programs should attempt to emulate. 
Description NSO's Low-Cost Dental Clinic provides a wide array of dental services -- from prevention and education to acute care. Services are offered at cost -- typically about half of what a private dentist would charge. Annually, we provide about 6,000 procedures to 2,000 patients. Most patients are the working poor - fiercely proud to pay their own way but uninsured and unable to pay the high price of private care.
Strategy
Population Served Adults At-Risk Populations Unemployed, Underemployed, Dislocated
Program Short-term SuccessHelpDescription of short-term achievement(s) or improvement(s) that will result from this program. 100% of our patients receive the dental care they need.
Program Long-term SuccessHelpDescription of the ultimate change(s) that will result from this program. This may be far into the future or represent an ideal state. The long-term success of the Low-Cost Dental Clinic can be measured in an improvement in the public health of our community. As the vital links between oral health and overall health continue to be uncovered, the impact of our services on the entire community are recognized. Oklahoma ranks dead last in the nation in the adults who regularly visit a dentist. With the success of the NSO Low-Cost Dental Clinic, we hope to impact that ranking.
Program Success MonitoringHelpDescription of the tools used to measure or track program impact. We measure success through the number of patients we see and the number of procedures we complete.
Examples of Program SuccessHelpSpecific examples of changes in behaviors or testimonies of changes that demonstrate program success.
Our patients often send us letters of thanks for the services they receive. An example of the impact of the program success can be seen in this letter from Mike (letter used with permission):

When you have missing teeth, people look down on you. Missing front teeth makes you have a speech problem and people think you are mentally unstable. I am a people person but when you talk to people and your words don’t come out right you really don't want to talk much.

NSO has lifted my self-esteem. The work they have done on my mouth has made a big difference in my whole spirit. I feel like I can be myself and my words come out right. My brother said, “Now that’s the Mike I remember!” Now I can smile, and when you smile, people smile back at you.

NOW THAT’S PRICELESS!

 

I want to thank NSO from the top of my gums to the bottom of my teeth. Ya’ll really put confidence back in my life. Please keep up the good work. Changing their appearance and their whole outlook on life—that’s what it did for me. May GOD BLESS YOU ALL.!

Thank you!

 

 

 

 
Description
NSO has three Transitional Living Programs (TLPs):
Martha's House: This TLP has seven, three-bedroom apartments for families (primarily mothers and children). 
Gatewood Home: This TLP is an apartment building with four, one-bedroom apartments. Women who are pregnant or have one young child live there.
Carolyn Williams Center - is a TLP for young men aged 18-23. Many have aged-out of the foster care system. 
 
All TLPs share some common features: clients must be homeless or at-risk of imminent homelessness to qualify. Most stay in the TLP from 6-24 months while they increase their household income, finish their education, seek entitlements to which they are eligible, complete life skills education, receive the health care they need, and receive daily counseling and mentoring on how to live independently. 
Strategy
Population Served Females Children and Youth (0 - 19 years) At-Risk Populations
Program Short-term SuccessHelpDescription of short-term achievement(s) or improvement(s) that will result from this program.
100% of our clients work with staff to complete a transitional housing life plan - expressing their goals, hopes and dreams and a realistic plan to achieve them.
 
Other short-term outcomes are measured by the number of clients who say they feel safe, are able to provide for themselves/children, have food security, have increased their income, and feel they are able to live independently.
Program Long-term SuccessHelpDescription of the ultimate change(s) that will result from this program. This may be far into the future or represent an ideal state. Long-term success is measured by the number of clients who are able to maintain independence in permanent housing. NSO has recently procured a comprehensive client case manager software package that will better help us track and coordinate services and track outcomes across the organization.
Program Success MonitoringHelpDescription of the tools used to measure or track program impact. NSO conducts regular surveys of clients to determine their outcomes. In addition, NSO reviews the specific goals of each client to determine how many of their outcomes have been achieved. However, NSO seeks to update its outcomes for all programs in the next year.
Examples of Program SuccessHelpSpecific examples of changes in behaviors or testimonies of changes that demonstrate program success.

Jacob’s mom and dad were alcoholics and drug addicts.Every few months, they moved from one filthy apartment to the next. Food was never a priority. When Jacob was six, he watched his father shoot and kill his mother. Things got bad after that.

Jacob was placed in the custody of a relative. That relative sexually abused Jacob. Every. Single. Day.

Jacob entered Oklahoma’s Foster Care system. He doesn’t remember how many homes he lived in. He doesn’t remember teachers or classmates – he changed schools and homes too often to bother developing relationships.

On his 18thbirthday, Jacob was ineligible for foster care. He was set on the street with an incomplete education, no family, no friends, no job and no coping skills. He ended up sleeping on the streets.

Jacob is a resident at the Carolyn Williams Center – and his story is not unusual. Today, he is enrolled in college. He says the CWC is the first real home he has had. Jacob not only envisions his future but he is looking forward to it.

Description Palo Duro is a permanent supportive housing program for chronically homeless adults with mental illnesses. Adults live in and maintain their own private apartment, but receive daily supervision from staff members to ensure their medical, physical and social needs are being met. Located across the street, psychiatric clinic staff ensure residents receive their medications and treatments regularly. They watch for signs of crises and are typically able to avert problems before they happen. Turnover at Palo Duro is low -- the residents build a cohesive community of peers, and regular social events help them remain active and making friends. 
Strategy
Population Served Adults People/Families with of People with Psychological Disabilities Poor,Economically Disadvantaged,Indigent
Program Short-term SuccessHelpDescription of short-term achievement(s) or improvement(s) that will result from this program. Short-term success is measured through occupancy rates and tenant satisfaction surveys.
Program Long-term SuccessHelpDescription of the ultimate change(s) that will result from this program. This may be far into the future or represent an ideal state. It's estimated that 25% of homeless people have a diagnosed mental illness. This leads to expensive treatment, incarceration, shelter, medical care and even death. A program like Palo Duro not only keeps these adults off the street and living productive lives, it lowers the cost of their lifelong care to the community.
Program Success MonitoringHelpDescription of the tools used to measure or track program impact. Program success is monitored through internal records as well as regular surveys of tenants. We also gather qualitative feedback from tenants on a daily basis to assess their progress. 
Description
Homeless Prevention Programs
NSO has several homeless prevention programs: 
The Emergency Assistance Program provides on-time financial assistance to individuals and families who are experiencing a real emergency. In these cases, only a few hundred dollars will keep the family from becoming homeless. Emergencies include loss of job, illness or accident, natural disasters and extraordinary utility bills (such as were experienced last summer).  NSO makes referrals to families who need additional assistance or why may not qualify for the program.
 
Permanent Supportive Housing - the TLP follow-up program. This new program follows clients who have left the TLPs and helps them the first critical months that they are living independently. Staff are able to counsel with clients on selecting appropriate housing, making deposits and having utilities turned on, working with landlords and household management. 
Strategy
Population Served Families Adults At-Risk Populations
Program Short-term SuccessHelpDescription of short-term achievement(s) or improvement(s) that will result from this program. Short-term success is measured by the number of people assisted. Each program has its own outcomes as well, which are measured through internal records as well as feedback from clients.
Program Long-term SuccessHelpDescription of the ultimate change(s) that will result from this program. This may be far into the future or represent an ideal state. Long term success is measured by impacting the homeless population in our community.
Program Success MonitoringHelpDescription of the tools used to measure or track program impact. Internal records and feedback from clients.
Examples of Program SuccessHelpSpecific examples of changes in behaviors or testimonies of changes that demonstrate program success.
Because the permanent supportive housing program is new, there are no success stories yet. However, we have hundreds of success stories from our Emergency Assistance Program. 
 
2011 was a record year for Oklahoma. The poor economy continued to impact our community but a record number of natural disasters had a huge impact on the working poor. In the course of one year, our community experience record cold temperatures, blizzards, tornadoes, record high temperatures, wild fires and even earthquakes.
 
People who considered themselves financially stable found themselves on the brink of homelessness because of record utility bills, home repairs and poor economic opportunities. 
 
Thanks to NSO's one-time emergency assistance, hundreds of families avoided homelessness - saving our community millions of dollars in the costs of sheltering and caring for them.
CEO/Executive Director
CEO/Executive Director Stacey Ninness
Start Date Aug 2005
Email sninness@nsookc.org
Experience
Education:
Bachelor of Arts in Counseling from East Central University, 1997
 
Experience:
  • Neighborhood Services Organization, CEO since 2005
  • Oklahoma Goodwill Industries, director of career development, 1998-2005
 
Affiliations/Leadership:
  • Leadership OKC, Class 28 (2010)
  • United Way of Central Oklahoma, volunteer (1998-present)
  • United Way Agency Directors Association, President 2008-2009
  • State Captain of National Alliance to End Homelessness, 2008-2011
  • Spokesperson, MAPS project, 2010
  • Selection committee, OKC Downtown Magazine, Hot Dads! 
  • Board member/Secretary, Oklahoma City NW Rotary, 2004-2008
  • Board member, Positive Tomorrows School, 2005-2007
  • Volunteer/First Aid Instructor, Red Cross, 2000-2006
 
Awards/Honors:
  • Most Admired CEO: Oklahoma Journal Record, 2013
  • Achievers Under 40: Oklahoma Journal Record, 2011
  • Member, Alliance Leadership Council/Oklahoma Center for Nonprofits, 2010
  • 40 Under 40/OKCBiz Magazine, 2010
  • 40 under 40 / Oklahoma Magazine, 2009
  • Hot Momma! /Oklahoma City Downtown Magazine, 2009
  • Woman of Outstanding Service/Zonta Club of Central Oklahoma (2007)
 
Senior Staff
NameTitle
Kenneth StephensChief Financial Officer
Staff
Number of Full-time Staff 27
Number of Part-time Staff 7
Number of Contract Staff 0
Number of Volunteers 400
Staff Retention Rate 95
Are professional development opportunities provided? Yes
Does CEO/Executive Director have formal evaluations? Yes
Management reports to board? Yes
Staff Demographics - Ethnicity
African American/Black 15
Asian American/Pacific Islander 0
Caucasian 12
Hispanic/Latino 6
Native American/American Indian 1
Staff Demographics - Gender
Male 6
Female 26
Organizational Plans
Fundraising Plan Yes
Policy against commission-based compensation for fundraising consultant No
Communication Plan Under Development
Strategic Plan Yes
Number of Years Strategic Plan Considers 5
Date Strategic Plan Adopted Jan 2015
Management Succession Plan No
Organization Policies and Procedures Yes
Collaborations

ReMerge

Oklahoma City Public Schools

Rain

Department of Human Services

Oklahoma City Housing Authority

PACT

Healing Hands

Birthchoice

Salvation Army

OSU-OKC

Oklahoma State Department of Health

Jesus House

Speck Homes

D-Dent

Department of Rehabilitation Services

City of Oklahoma City

Alcoholics Anonymous

City Rescue Mission

OG&E

Planned Parenthood

St. Anthony Birthing Center

Passageways

Church of the Servant

Oklahoma Housing Finance Agency

Positive Tomorrows

FreshStart Counseling Services

United Methodist Women

Department of Housing and Urban Development

Homeless Alliance

Community Action Agency

Be The Change

HOPE Community Services

City Care

Red Rock

OKC Metro Alliance

Heartline 2-1-1

Awards
Awards
Award/RecognitionOrganizationYear
Apex Award for Special Needs HousingOklahoma Housing Finance Authority2011
Achiever Under 40 - Award for NSO's CEOOklahoma Journal Record2011
40 Under 40 - Award for NSO's CEOOKCBiz Magazine2010
40 Under 40 - Award for NSO's CEOOklahoma Magazine2009
Hot Mamma! Award for NSO's CEOOKC Downtown Magazine2009
Woman of Outstanding Service for NSO's CEOZonta Club of Central Oklahoma2007
Apex Award for Special Needs HousingOklahoma Housing Finance Authority2005
Most-Admired CEO (Stacey Ninness)Oklahoma Journal Record2013
ONE Award finalistOklahoma Center for Nonprofits2013
Government Licenses
Is your organization licensed by the government (federal, state and/or local)? No
Board Chair
Name Brian Knight
Company Affiliation Eide Bailly LLP
Term July 2016 to June 2017
Email bknight@eidebailly.com
Board of Directors
List Current as of July 01, 2016
Board of Directors List
NameAffiliationStatus
Sue Alberti Devon Energy CenterVoting
Linda Brinkworth Voting
Susan Carr Moore Public SchoolsVoting
Jill Castilla Citizens Bank of EdmondVoting
Roman Chavez OG&E Energy CorpVoting
Matilda Clements Community VolunteerVoting
Lauren Decker HR Data Reporting and AnalyticsVoting
Sue Ellis President, Crossroads District UMCExofficio
Steve Ford Zahl-Ford, Inc.Voting
Nova Hammersley Mid-Market Account ManagementVoting
Cindy Hull Pres of Oklahoma Conference United Methodist WomenExofficio
Jim Hunter Retired Real Estate DeveloperVoting
Brian Knight Eide Bailly, LLPVoting
Vicki Knotts Newmark GrubbVoting
Joe Rolston AttorneyVoting
Paige Ross ONEGAS Corp.Voting
Jacqueline Sit Candor ExecutiveVoting
Greg Tener United Methodist ChurchExofficio
Charis Ward First American Title Insurance CompanyVoting
Wendi Wilson Oklahoma Heart HospitalVoting
Board Demographics - Ethnicity
African American/Black 0
Asian American/Pacific Islander 1
Caucasian 17
Hispanic/Latino 1
Native American/American Indian 1
Other 0 0
Board Demographics - Gender
Male 6
Female 14
Standing Committees
Executive
Finance
Nominating
Personnel
Building
Institutional Advancement
Current Fiscal Year
Fiscal Year July 01, 2016-June 30, 2017
Current Year Budgeted Total Income $2,567,695
Current Year Budgeted Total Expenses $2,479,530
IRS Letter of Determination
Prior Three Years' Financial History
Revenue and ExpensesHelpFinancial data for prior years is entered by foundation staff based on the documents submitted by nonprofit organizations.Foundation staff members enter this information to assure consistency in the presentation of financial data across all organizations.
Fiscal Year201520142013
Total Revenue$2,766,496$3,382,571$2,908,068
Total Expenses$2,288,858$2,223,183$2,024,647
Revenue Less Expenses$477,638$1,159,388$883,421
Revenue SourcesHelpThe financial analysis involves a comparison of the IRS Form 990 and the audit report (when available) and revenue sources may not sum to total based on reconciliation differences. Revenue from foundations and corporations may include individual contributions when not itemized separately.
Fiscal Year201520142013
Foundation and
Corporation Contributions
$290,249$396,673$87,825
Government Contributions$887,120$909,087$861,519
Federal------
State------
Local------
Unspecified$887,120$909,087$861,519
Individual Contributions$777,129$1,268,331$948,318
$329,036$316,901$292,633
$315,260$334,152$393,540
Investment Income, Net of Losses$22,006$18,514$14,895
Unrealized Gain/Loss($2,729)$15,274$6,208
Membership Dues------
Special Events--$10,688--
Revenue In-Kind$7,517--$296,179
Other$140,908$112,951$6,951
Expense Allocation
Fiscal Year201520142013
Program Expense$1,877,968$1,842,363$1,626,146
Administration Expense$282,927$236,210$229,983
Fundraising Expense$127,963$144,610$168,518
Payments to Affiliates------
Total Revenue/Total Expenses1.211.521.44
Program Expense/Total Expenses82%83%80%
Fundraising Expense/Contributed Revenue6%5%8%
Assets and Liabilities
Fiscal Year201520142013
Total Assets$4,998,020$4,509,467$3,329,296
Current Assets$698,434$269,329$936,228
Long-Term Liabilities$946,646$950,031$941,657
Current Liabilities$209,876$195,576$183,167
Total Net Assets$3,841,498$3,363,860$2,204,472
Solvency
Short Term Solvency
Fiscal Year201520142013
Current Ratio: Current Assets/Current Liabilities3.331.385.11
Long Term Solvency
Fiscal Year201520142013
Long-Term Liabilities/Total Assets19%21%28%
Funding Sources
Top Funding Sources
Fiscal Year201520142013
Top Funding Source & Dollar AmountGovt - Unspecified $887,120Individuals $1,268,331Individuals $948,318
Second Highest Funding Source & Dollar AmountIndividuals $777,129Govt - Unspecified $909,087Govt - Unspecified $861,519
Third Highest Funding Source & Dollar AmountIndirect Public Support $329,036Foundations & Corporations $396,673Earned Revenue $393,540
Endowment? Yes
Endowment Spending Policy Percentage
Endowment Spending Policy Percentage (if selected) 5 %
Credit Line? No
Reserve Fund? Yes
Capital Campaign
Currently in a Capital Campaign? Yes
Campaign Purpose To construct a new building for the dental clinic/headquarters.
Campaign Goal $3,100,000
Campaign Dates Oct 2011 to Dec 2015
Amount Raised To Date $2,700,000 as of June 2015
Capital Campaign Anticipated in Next Five Years? No
Comments on Financials
Foundation Staff Comments
All financial information is from audited financial statements.
 
Organizations with a GiveSmartOKC profile are responsible for updating information annually within 45 days following the end of their fiscal year.

 
Address 411 SW 11th
Oklahoma City, OK 73109 9406
Primary Phone 405 236-0452
Contact Email nso@nsookc.org
Give with Credit Card http://www.nsookc.org
Give to Endowment http://occf.org/nso/
CEO/Executive Director Stacey Ninness
Board Chair Brian Knight
Board Chair Company Affiliation Eide Bailly LLP

 

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