Oklahoma Foundation for the Disabled, Inc.
8421 N Walker Ave
Oklahoma City OK 73114
Tax Exempt Status Public Supported Charity
Organization Does Business As (DBA) Name(s)
Organization DBA
OKFD
Mission Statement
Our Mission: To improve the quality of life of developmentally-disabled
central Oklahoma adults by providing them with high quality and transformative programs and services that include life skills training, recreational activities and socialization opportunities in a safe, caring and compassion-focused environment.  
Socialization is the most important achievement of the program and the one in which the greatest improvement is noticeable.
Contact Information
Contact Name Georgia Devening
Contact email info@OKFD.org
Address 8421 N Walker Ave
Oklahoma City, OK 73114
Phone (405) 842-6636
Fax 405-842-6658
County Oklahoma
How to Give
Donate with Credit Card http://okfd.org/help.html
Donate to Endowment http://occf.org/ofd/
Other ways to donate, support or volunteer
  • Checks can be made payable to OKFD and mailed to 8421 N Walker Ave., OKC, OK 73114
  • Credit card donations can be made via our secure website, www.okfd.org
  • In-kind items like clothing, furniture, kitchen ware, and books, as examples, are nice, but please call us at 842-6636 first
  • Volunteers are needed and welcome to assist with specific client activities, Monday through Friday or Thursday evenings at our  "Foundation FunNite!" from 6-9 PM.  (Volunteers must first fill out a questionnaire and submit to a background check.) 
  • Gently used household items can be donated to Bargain Thrift in OKFD's name, and they contribute a portion of sales each month to us, so contact them at 866-OKPICKUP (866-657-4258) or via email at donorservices@donationpickup.org or via their website: www.donationpickup.org.
  • We have many different work projects for volunteer groups, from painting walls, to washing buses and vans to gardening. Contact Georgia Devening at 842-6636 for details.
  
Financial Summary
 
 
Projected Revenue $1,440,000.00
Projected Expenses $1,440,000.00
History and Background
Former Names
NameYear
None
Year Founded 1960
IRS Ruling Year 1964
State Registration Expiration Mar 2017
Statements
Mission
Our Mission: To improve the quality of life of developmentally-disabled
central Oklahoma adults by providing them with high quality and transformative programs and services that include life skills training, recreational activities and socialization opportunities in a safe, caring and compassion-focused environment.  
Background
Oklahoma Foundation for the Disabled, Inc. (OKFD) was founded in 1960 by the National Council of Jewish Women through a grant from the Oklahoma City Junior Hospitality Club, Inc., and under the leadership of Mrs. Lois Miller, Mrs. Mickey Reynolds and Dr. John Boland.  Their efforts were the result of an earlier community survery that established the need for a recreational facility that would support the process of individuals re-entering and participating in a world unaccustomed to disabilities. At the time, what OKFD was doing was groundbreaking.  It served both children and adults.
 
The original OKFD facility was located at NW 33rd and Classen Blvd. for the first six years of operation.  In the mid-60s, board members approached Oklahoma City business and civic leader Sylvan Goldman for assistance in creating a new facility on land that was more appropriate for a growing client population.  Mr. Goldman donated land and helped construct a freestanding facility at 8421 N. Walker Ave. in Oklahoma City in 1967.  The facility still acts as OKFD's headquarters. 
 
Over the years, more rehabilitation programs were established for persons with brain injuries and other disabilities that would benefit from therapy, while OKFD evolved to serve those persons with developmental disabilities, who require constant supervision and are not employable. 
 
In 2005, the Oklahoma State Department of Human Services approached and encouraged the Foundation to become licensed as an adult day care for persons with disabilities.  A license was issued  March 12, 2006  for 96 clients per day. (Today, we are licensed for 104 adult clients.)
 
In 2008, Impact Oklahoma awarded a $100,000 grant to construct a 4,000 square foot recreation building; it was dedicated in February 2011. 
 
Today, OKFD is the only agency of its kind in central Oklahoma with the staff, experience, programs and services to meet the day care health needs of developmentally-disabled adults, who live with cerebral palsy, autism, Down syndrome and blindness, as examples.  Some clients are non-verbal and many use wheelchairs.  Clients range in age from 18 to 74 years and their mental capacity is from several months to age 12.  
 
We are open Monday through Friday and on Thursday evenings.  The services we provide include door-to-door transportation (our 11-vehicle fleet travels 16,000 miles per month throughout central Oklahoma); nutrition in the form of lunch and two snacks; activities that focus on health and wellness and life skills and these include games, exercise, dance, singing, scouting, field trips, shopping excursions, outdoor recreation, gardening, hygiene, arts and crafts, reading and writing.
 
On an average day we have 80 clients and on Thursday evenings the number swells to 150 for our Foundation FunNite! socialization event that takes place 50 out of 52 weeks a year. Annually, we record more than 18,500 client visits to our North Walker campus.
 
The type services our staff team is skilled at providing include: lifting and positioning, diabetes monitoring, tube feeding, hand feeding, toileting, diaper changing and colostomy hygiene.
 
While our services are primarily focused on clients, benefits of what we do also extends to our clients' caregivers through the respite care they receive.  Because our clients are adults, their caregivers are often elderly parents on fixed incomes or siblings who work or go to school and who have other family members for whom they are responsible.  Respite care is a valuable community contribution. 
 
Impact

Accomplishments last year:

Programs/Services -

· We continued to maintain high client service numbers, which was a sign that our program is meeting the needs of a lot of area citizens. Last year, we served on average, 75 clients on weekdays and 150 individuals on Thursday nights for an estimated total number of clients served. 26,775.

· We initiated and then completed a year-long Get Fit! health and wellness program that was underwritten by Oklahoma City Community Foundation. Clients participating in the program learned about the 5210 program that recommends (1) Servings of five fruits or vegetables daily to increase fiber and anti-oxidant intake, (2) Two hours or less of leisure screen time (TV or computer) to allow for more activity time, (3) One hour of daily activity to build muscle mass, and (4) Zero sweetened beverages to lower calorie intake.

· At the state of Oklahoma’s recommendation, we began the process of establishing a separate entity for the purpose of employing high-functioning disabled individuals in a monitored setting that helps them learn skills and earn a paycheck. We rented a small warehouse for sorting donated items that we in turn will resell, once the program becomes operational.

· We received architectural plans for the development of a Health & Wellness Park on our campus that when finished will accelerate our efforts to greatly improve our clients’ exercise and recreation options.

Volunteers -

· We welcomed three new board members. They are graduates of United Way of Central Oklahoma’s Board Serve program. Each person has a set of unique skills and interests that will benefit us.

Fundraising /Public Outreach -

· We held the second ever Compassionate Citizen of the Year Awards ceremony on June 9. This brings top civic leaders onto our campus for a morning event that features one or more honorees. This represents our signature annual fundraising special event. We received great pre- and post-event coverage in area newspapers. The event raised more than $20,000.

· We successfully met the $30,000 challenge grant put forth by the Carl C. Anderson, Sr. and Marie Jo Anderson Charitable Foundation.

· United Way of Central Oklahoma granted us a 5.5 percent increase in our annual allocation, based on their review of our program and determination that what we did for clients and caregivers alike merited additional financial support.

· We received funding for two wheelchair swings from the Junior League of Oklahoma City, and will have that equipment installed within a couple of weeks.


Needs
Accomplishments last year:

Programs/Services -

We continued to maintain high client service numbers, which was a sign that our program is meeting the needs of a lot of area citizens. Last year, we served on average, 75 clients on weekdays and 150 individuals on Thursday nights for an estimated total number of clients served. 26,775.

We initiated and then completed a year-long Get Fit! health and wellness program that was underwritten by Oklahoma City Community Foundation. Clients participating in the program learned about the 5210 program that recommends (1) Servings of five fruits or vegetables daily to increase fiber and anti-oxidant intake, (2) Two hours or less of leisure screen time (TV or computer) to allow for more activity time, (3) One hour of daily activity to build muscle mass, and (4) Zero sweetened beverages to lower calorie intake.

At the state of Oklahoma’s recommendation, we began the process of establishing a separate entity for the purpose of employing high-functioning disabled individuals in a monitored setting that helps them learn skills and earn a paycheck. We rented a small warehouse for sorting donated items that we in turn will resell, once the program becomes operational.

We received architectural plans for the development of a Health & Wellness Park on our campus that when finished will accelerate our efforts to greatly improve our clients’ exercise and recreation options.

Volunteers -

We welcomed three new board members. They are graduates of United Way of Central Oklahoma’s Board Serve program. Each person has a set of unique skills and interests that will benefit us.

Fundraising /Public Outreach -

We held the second ever Compassionate Citizen of the Year Awards ceremony on June 9. This brings top civic leaders onto our campus for a morning event that features one or more honorees. This represents our signature annual fundraising special event. We received great pre- and post-event coverage in area newspapers. The event raised more than $20,000.

We successfully met the $30,000 challenge grant put forth by the Carl C. Anderson, Sr. and Marie Jo Anderson Charitable Foundation.

United Way of Central Oklahoma granted us a 5.5 percent increase in our annual allocation, based on their review of our program and determination that what we did for clients and caregivers alike merited additional financial support.

We received funding for two wheelchair swings from the Junior League of Oklahoma City, and will have that equipment installed within a couple of weeks.

Goals for this year:

Securing scholarship funds for our clients so they can participate fully in our weekday and Thursday evening programs is critically important. None of our clients pay the actual cost of our services, so we must actively fund raise to fill this gap in our budget. Scholarships cover meals, door-to-door transportation, activities and personal care.

We seek to build a Health & Wellness Park on our campus that will provide clients with an array of exercise and fitness options. This venue will feature specialized play equipment that meets the needs of our developmentally-disabled adult clients including swings, slides and ramps and a walking trail with exercise stations and a pavilion.

Involving more people in the community in our organization through volunteer opportunities that include: Hands-on interaction with clients at Foundation FunNites! (take place on Thursday evenings throughout the year); Service as a governing board member---individuals with skills in fundraising, human resources, finances and law are of particular interest to us; and Service as a Teen Board member.





 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
CEO/Executive Director Statement
You really have to see our clients and staff to appreciate what OKFD means to the central Oklahoma disability community.  We make a huge difference in the lives of disabled adult persons and their caregivers. 
 
Our services have always met a vital community need.  There is no other program exactly like ours.  That's why our clients travel to us from five area counties. 
 
While our clients are severely disabled, we make sure they participate in life to their fullest potential.  We even employ a dance instructor on Tuesday and Wednesday afternoons to train our "Tappers" client dance troupe, which performs throughout the community. This type activity increases their self confidence and social skills, and a moving body is much more health than one that's sedentary. 
 
Many clients feel our facility is their home away from home because they spend so much time with our staff and their peers.  They are comfortable, feel secure and have friends. 
 
We'd like to give you a tour.  Please call us at 842-6636.
Board Chair Statement
Oklahoma Foundation for the Disabled, Inc. provides important social services to an under-served population, adults with severe developmental disabilities and their caregivers, so it is incumbent on our board of directors to support our staff team and the organization in any way possible.
 
I have found through my interaction with clients and their family members that what this organization does to enhance their quality of life is greatly appreciated.  That OKFD is the oldest and largest organization of its kind in central Oklahoma also makes me feel great about helping it operate for the good of my fellow citizens.  
 
Like other nonprofit organizations that rely on state funding for a large portion of our revenues, we never have enough money to do what we need to do, so private charitable contributions are very important, and how to acquire them by talking to individuals and submitting grant requests is something we strive to improve upon so as to better balance out our revenue streams.
 
Even though OKFD is 56 years old, many area citizens do not know about us, so we are working hard to get the message out through a media plan and a new special event: Compassionate Citizen of the Year Award.
 
I believe OKFD exists today in part because of the dedication of our staff team and board members (past and present), who understand its value to each individual client and their caregivers.   
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Area Served
Area Served
Geographic Area Served
Oklahoma City
Canadian County
Central Oklahoma
Cleveland County
Lincoln County
Midwest City/Del City
Logan County
Midwest City/Del City
Oklahoma City, Bethany, Choctaw, Del City, Edmond, El Reno, Guthrie, Jones, Luther, Midwest City, Moore, Mustang, Nicoma Park, Norman, Piedmont, Shawnee, Spencer, Yukon, McLoud, Chandler, Chickasha
Service Categories
Secondary Organizational Category Human Services/Developmentally Disabled Services/Centers
Tertiary Organizational Category Human Services/Adult Day Care
Programs
Description Client Transportation Program - On weekdays and Thursday nights throughout the year, we provide door-to-door transportation to clients who live throughout central Oklahoma.Without this service, they would be unable to access our north Oklahoma City campus. Our specialized 11-vehicle fleet of vans and buses are equipped with drivers and aides, who are skilled in working with special needs clients.Monthly, our vans and buses log a combined 17,000 miles in trips. Without charitable donations, we could not operate this valuable program.
Strategy
Population Served Adults Elderly and/or Disabled People/Families with of People with Disabilities
Program Short-term SuccessHelpDescription of short-term achievement(s) or improvement(s) that will result from this program. We can achieve success each day by successfully transporting clients to and from our campus.
Program Long-term SuccessHelpDescription of the ultimate change(s) that will result from this program. This may be far into the future or represent an ideal state. We define success as follows: (1) anyone wishing to participate in our program being able to do so regardless of financial circumstances; (2) healthier individuals because our programs emphasize exercise, activities and nutrition; (3) well socialized individuals because they are exposed to able-bodied and disabled persons for up to 8 hours weekdays and 4 hours Thursday nights; and (4) more content and rested caregivers who receive the benefit of respite when their loved ones are in our care.    
Program Success MonitoringHelpDescription of the tools used to measure or track program impact. We monitor client activities every hour they are in our care. Our drivers are licensed to drive commercial vehicles.  Each of them keeps a daily activity list that includes the names of each client's pick-up and drop-off times.
Examples of Program SuccessHelpSpecific examples of changes in behaviors or testimonies of changes that demonstrate program success. We receive daily input from caregivers about their loved one’s experiences. The following caregiver comments are typical of the feedback we get. “She is excited each day to go to the Foundation; she usually does not like to go out.” “He stands by the door waiting for the bus.” “Respite allows me time to be a better sister and caregiver.” “I am very thankful for OKFD.It gives my son a safe place to go and socialize and provides activities to keep him busy and entertained.Without OKFD, I would not be able to work.”
Description The programs we offer developmentally-disabled adults and their caregivers in central Oklahoma, are only possible through a blend of revenues including state reimbursement and private charitable contributions. Because state reimbursement is capped at $45 per client per day no matter how many hours he or she is in our care, and because the door-to-door client transportation we provide is only partially underwritten by outside sources, we must seek donations from the general public, companies and foundations in order to maintain our robust operation. The Client Scholarship Program ensures we have the funds necessary to offer our program to adults who wish to participate.
Strategy
Population Served Adults People/Families with People of Developmental Disabilities People/Families with of People with Physical Disabilities
Program Short-term SuccessHelpDescription of short-term achievement(s) or improvement(s) that will result from this program. Short-term success includes us being able to serve all the clients who need our services through enrollment in our weekday program.
Program Long-term SuccessHelpDescription of the ultimate change(s) that will result from this program. This may be far into the future or represent an ideal state.
Having been in operation since 1960, we have lots of experience working with adults with developmental disabilities.  Success can be defined in many ways including service numbers. The need for our program has only grown in recent years, and is only limited because the state of Oklahoma has a backlog of individuals seeking disability status that would allow them to participate in our program.
 
We also measure success in the way clients learn new skills, come out of their shell and learn to interact with others and stay healthy.
 
 
 
Program Success MonitoringHelpDescription of the tools used to measure or track program impact.
Our staff is trained to interact with and care for developmentally-disabled adults, and they track their activities many times throughout the day, from the the time they are picked up by the bus to the time they are dropped off at home in the late afternoon.  Tracking includes medications, toileting, activities and nutritional intake.
 
Our program is also monitored by the Oklahoma City-County Health Department and the Oklahoma State Department of Social Services.
Examples of Program SuccessHelpSpecific examples of changes in behaviors or testimonies of changes that demonstrate program success. July 8, 2016 Dear Georgia, Lola and the wonderful staff: This is a letter to tell you how much your Get Fit! Program has helped my son, Robbie Allen, who is a client. Robbie just went to his doctor for his physical check-up and blood work. His doctor said his results in the last six months are so improved he does not have to take his high blood pressure medicine, his cholesterol is normal, all results were improved.He has lost over 20 pounds and all this improvement, I know, is because of the Get Fit! Program you implemented.(He even tells me what to eat.)Please, don’t stop helping these very special and wonderful people, because the exercise and diet has made a world of difference in my son’s health. I want to give a very special thank you to his OKFD coach, Bill, who encourages, motivates and gives his support to our children, from bowling to Special Olympics and the Get Fit! Exercise program.He dedication has helped to change their lives.So, thank you, Bill. Again, thank you to all the wonderful staff for your dedication and hard work on behalf of all our children. Sincerely, Janice Allen
Disaster Programs
Description
ICS is a standardized, on -scene, all-hazards incident management approach that:
 
Allows for the integration of facilities, equipment, personnel, procedures, and communications operating withing a common organization structure.
Description
Our program manager is our disaster preparedness point person. 
 
We have teamed up with United Way, OKC Police and Fire Departments, and  the OKC Public Works Department of Oklahoma City. 
 
There is a series of 13 classes on Incident Command Center.  Some classes are taught in a classroom setting while others may be taken online.  There is a  tremendous amount of new terminology involved and that has been the focus, but also including "levels of command" during the first few classes.  Everyone is tested at the end of each session.  We have volunteered the use of our facilities and supplies, ie, furniture, blankets.
 
We are please to be involved with this community event to participate in  case of a disaster.  
Comments on Programs
CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments
I. Our greatest challenge is having the financial resources we need to maintain a robust adult day health program.  Here's why:
 
All of our weekday clients are classified as low-income and do not work. They do not have their own funds.  Based on their disabilities, the majority of them receive aid from the state, either as being "fully disabled" or less funding if they are on the state's "waiting list."  There are currently more than 7,000 Oklahomans on the waiting list.
 
Our program relies largely on reimbursement from the state of Oklahoma for those who are both qualified and waiting list clients.  The most we receive on a per-client, per-day basis is $45 for a "fully qualified" disabled client, which is $12 less than our actual cost of operation, and this means we lose $2,700 per-person annually.  For waiting list clients we lose even more money: $4,500 per-client annually.  
 
Furthermore, state reimbursement does not cover transportation, and since our clients do not drive we provide it as an unfunded necessity. 
 
Annually, we have several hundred thousand dollars in unfunded services.
 
To resolve this dilemma we have taken the following actions:
 
a.  Launched a client scholarship fund and sought donations from charitable foundations, corporations and others;
 
b. Formed a clients' caregiver group to address funding issues and get their support to help us fundraise; and
 
c.  Met with state officials regularly to discuss the need for additional funding.
 
 II.  Our greatest opportunity is making capital improvements to our campus that enhance client programs and services.  We have taken the following steps:
 
b. We are also studying the merits of an outdoor fitness, exercise and playground area to complement our existing indoor efforts to promote health and wellness. This project includes a fitness track, pavilion and playground with special equipment suited for developmentally-disabled adults.  The cost is $300,000.
CEO/Executive Director
CEO/Executive Director Georgia Devening
Start Date Jan 2001
Email gdevening@okfd.org
Experience
Georgia Devening has been the Executive Director for 15 years, but associated with the Foundation for many more years, first as an active volunteer and then for two years as a board member.  
 
She got involved because her late brother, Gary Owen, who had Down syndrome, was an OKFD client.
 
She is a graduate of the University of Central Olahoma, a member of  Leading Age (Adult Day Health Care Group), United Way Directors Association. and St. Mark Lutheran Church.  In 2014, Governor Mary Fallin appointed Devening to the Oklahoma Board of Examiners for Long-Term Care Administrators.
 
Prior to coming to OKFD, she served for 19 years at Grace Petroleum in its treasury department.
Senior Staff
NameTitle
Lola BuslerSocial Services Coordinator
Staff
Number of Full-time Staff 36
Number of Part-time Staff 5
Number of Contract Staff 0
Number of Volunteers 250
Staff Retention Rate 82
Are professional development opportunities provided? Yes
Does CEO/Executive Director have formal evaluations? Yes
Management reports to board? Yes
Staff Demographics - Ethnicity
African American/Black 25
Caucasian 13
Hispanic/Latino 1
Native American/American Indian 2
Staff Demographics - Gender
Male 11
Female 30
Organizational Plans
Fundraising Plan Yes
Policy against commission-based compensation for fundraising consultant Yes
Communication Plan Yes
Strategic Plan Yes
Number of Years Strategic Plan Considers 3
Date Strategic Plan Adopted July 2015
Management Succession Plan Yes
Organization Policies and Procedures Yes
Collaborations
Oklahoma City Community College
Easter Seals
Metropolitan Living Center
Daily Living Centers
EARC
Boy Scouts
Special Olympics
Dale Rogers Training Center
Affiliations
AffiliationYear
LeadingAge Oklahoma formerly Oklahoma Association of Homes and Services for the Aging (OKAHSA)2010
Chamber of Commerce2005
United Way of Central Oklahoma member agency1964
Awards
Awards
Award/RecognitionOrganizationYear
Festival of Hope AwardHeartLine, Inc.2014
Risk Management Provisions
Commercial General Insurance
Commercial General Liability and D and O and Umbrella or Excess and Automobile and Professional
Government Licenses
Is your organization licensed by the government (federal, state and/or local)? Yes
Comments on Staff & Management
CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments
What we do is life-changing for persons with severe disabilities.  We see it every day.  A 40-year-old Down syndrome woman smiles for the first time because she has a new friend.  A 60-year-old male with cerebral palsy learns to use an exercise machine and is able to improve his balance as a result.  And a blind 23-year-old learns to dance in a group before a United Way funder group, where she experiences applause for a job well done.  It often brings tears to our eyes and smiles to our lips.
 
We also positively impact clients' caregivers.  Imagine if you had to care for someone with a severe disability, say in a wheelchair, for 24 hours a day.  You are 70-years of age.  Your back is not what it used to be, and you don't have the financial resources to hire an aide.  What you do have, is peace of mind that during the six-or-eight hours your loved one is at OKFD is time you have to yourself.  This type of respite care is a tremendous gift to a caregiver.
 
Our programs help with socialization, mobility, hygiene and overall health and wellness.  It's so much better for a wheelchair person to be with us and active during the day then languishing in front of a television set, where he or she will probably not receive the attention or nutrition or mind stimulation necessary to lead a healthy life.  And it's so much better for a young 18-year- old Down syndrome woman to be participating in life-skills training with us then by herself at home while her mother is at work. 
 
Client care funding is our major problem.  The state only pays for six hours per weekday, although we have clients oftentimes for eight hours, and we pick up the costs of transportation for 11 vehicles that travel 17,000 miles per month.  We cannot serve more persons with disabilities due to this lack of funding.  In the past three years we have not accepted a new client who is not funded under the state contract.  This is a government problem, which we hope will be resolved soon.  We are working with Oklahoma legislators concerning these issues.   
Board Chair
Name Mr. Parrish Whitaker
Company Affiliation MidFirst Bank
Term July 2014 to June 2016
Email parrish.whitaker@midfirst.com
Board of Directors
List Current as of July 15, 2015
Board of Directors List
NameAffiliationStatus
Mr. Steve Adamo First Fidelity BankVoting
Mrs Rosetta J. Culpepper
Mr. Tom Lefmann RetiredVoting
Ms. Arete Moorehead American Fidelity Assurance Co.Voting
Ms. Kelley Rhodes CPAHertzVoting
Mr. Stephen Ross DigiPrintVoting
Mr. Blake Trippet Meta FundVoting
Mrs Connie Weber Estate Sales and Liquidations, Inc.Voting
Mr. Parrish Whitaker MidFirst TrustVoting
Ms. Carolyn J. Wood TARCVoting
Board Demographics - Ethnicity
African American/Black 1
Asian American/Pacific Islander 0
Caucasian 9
Hispanic/Latino 0
Board Demographics - Gender
Male 5
Female 5
Governance
Board Term Lengths 3 years
Percentage of Board Making Monetary Contributions to the Organization 100 %
Percentage of Board Making In-Kind Contributions to the Organization 35 %
Board Orientation Yes
Constituency Includes Client Representation Yes
Written Board Selection Criteria? Yes
Standing Committees
Executive
Nominating
Personnel
Campus Planning and Development
Comments on Board & Governance
CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments
Not enough citizens know about our services, and our location is somewhat isolated, so we are working hard on image building and public awareness.
Current Fiscal Year
Fiscal Year July 01, 2016-June 30, 2017
Current Year Budgeted Total Income $1,440,000
Current Year Budgeted Total Expenses $1,440,000
Financial Documents
Audit2014
Audit2013
Audit2012
Audit2011
Audit2010
Audit2009
Prior Three Years' Financial History
Revenue and ExpensesHelpFinancial data for prior years is entered by foundation staff based on the documents submitted by nonprofit organizations.Foundation staff members enter this information to assure consistency in the presentation of financial data across all organizations.
Fiscal Year201420132012
Total Revenue$1,561,219$1,400,853$1,090,768
Total Expenses$1,368,900$1,258,314$1,189,385
Revenue Less Expenses$192,319$142,539($98,617)
Revenue SourcesHelpThe financial analysis involves a comparison of the IRS Form 990 and the audit report (when available) and revenue sources may not sum to total based on reconciliation differences. Revenue from foundations and corporations may include individual contributions when not itemized separately.
Fiscal Year201420132012
Foundation and
Corporation Contributions
------
Government Contributions$792,176$712,406$609,791
Federal------
State$792,176$712,406$609,791
Local------
Unspecified------
Individual Contributions$158,476$164,878$127,186
$196,559$187,016$160,137
$119,770$128,919$97,616
Investment Income, Net of Losses$26,210$18,147$8,202
Unrealized Gain/Loss$93,599$80,573--
Membership Dues------
Special Events$152,738$106,860$80,834
Revenue In-Kind------
Other$21,691$2,054$7,002
Expense Allocation
Fiscal Year201420132012
Program Expense$1,081,431$994,068$939,614
Administration Expense$205,335$188,747$178,408
Fundraising Expense$82,134$75,499$71,363
Payments to Affiliates------
Total Revenue/Total Expenses1.141.110.92
Program Expense/Total Expenses79%79%79%
Fundraising Expense/Contributed Revenue6%6%7%
Assets and Liabilities
Fiscal Year201420132012
Total Assets$1,368,900$1,619,128$1,438,122
Current Assets$823,359$789,462$596,393
Long-Term Liabilities$48,832$136,165$410,000
Current Liabilities$290,305$356,011$43,709
Total Net Assets$1,029,763$1,126,952$984,413
Solvency
Short Term Solvency
Fiscal Year201420132012
Current Ratio: Current Assets/Current Liabilities2.842.2213.64
Long Term Solvency
Fiscal Year201420132012
Long-Term Liabilities/Total Assets4%8%29%
Funding Sources
Top Funding Sources
Fiscal Year201420132012
Top Funding Source & Dollar AmountGovt - State $792,176Govt - State $712,406Govt - State $609,791
Second Highest Funding Source & Dollar AmountIndirect Public Support $196,559Indirect Public Support $187,016Indirect Public Support $160,137
Third Highest Funding Source & Dollar AmountIndividuals $158,476Individuals $164,878Individuals $127,186
Endowment? Yes
Endowment Spending Policy Percentage
Endowment Spending Policy Percentage (if selected) 5 %
Credit Line? Yes
Reserve Fund? Yes
Capital Campaign
Currently in a Capital Campaign? Yes
Campaign Purpose Health & Wellness Park
Campaign Goal $500,000
Campaign Dates Mar 2016 to Mar 2017
Amount Raised To Date $50,000 as of Dec 2017
Capital Campaign Anticipated in Next Five Years? Yes
Comments on Financials
CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments
We have a small management staff that also includes financial management.  Segregation of duties are in order and cash is strictly
controlled.  The board treasurer reviews financials and consults with E.D. on matters.
Foundation Staff Comments
All prior year financial information is from audited financial statements.
Address 8421 N Walker Ave
Oklahoma City, OK 73114
Primary Phone 405 842-6636
Contact Email info@OKFD.org
Give with Credit Card http://okfd.org/help.html
Give to Endowment http://occf.org/ofd/
CEO/Executive Director Georgia Devening
Board Chair Mr. Parrish Whitaker
Board Chair Company Affiliation MidFirst Bank

 

Related Information

Emergency & Disaster Response Organizations

In times of disasters, there are nonprofit and religious organizations that can assist those affected whether it be a personal disaster or a wide-scale disaster. Several of the organizations listed in this area are members of the national Voluntary Organizations Active in Disaster (National VOAD).

United Way of Central Oklahoma Agencies

United Way of Central Oklahoma creates lasting changes in people's lives right here in our community. No longer just a fundraising organization, today United Way is on the front lines of some of our community's most pressing problems through the work of 60 agencies. Click on "view organizations" to view the United Way of Central Oklahoma agencies with current GiveSmartOKC profiles.