Urban League of Greater Oklahoma City Inc.
3900 N Martin Luther King Ave
Oklahoma City OK 73111-5220
Tax Exempt Status Public Supported Charity
Organization Does Business As (DBA) Name(s)
Organization DBA
N/A
Mission Statement To assist African Americans, other minorities, and the poor, to achieve social and economic equality.
Contact Information
Contact Name Valerie Thompson
Contact email urbanleague@urbanleagueok.org
Address 3900 N Martin Luther King Ave
Oklahoma City, OK 73111 5220
Phone (405) 424-5243
Fax 405-427-3647
County Oklahoma County
How to Give
Donate with Credit Card http://urbanleagueok.org/donate/
Donate to Endowment http://occf.org/ulokc/
Other ways to donate, support or volunteer Interested in volunteering at the Urban League?  Volunteer opportunities include:
  •     Career speakers for youth leadership development
  •     Professional training expertise in financial literacy, real estate purchasing, small business development, health education, etc.
  •     Volunteer as a Mentor
  •     Special event volunteers
  •     Office/administrative assistance, and more!
Sign up here to be included in the Urban League volunteer database.  You will be contacted when a volunteer opportunity occurs.

Thank you for your support of the Urban League!
Financial Summary
 
 
Projected Revenue $1,634,500.00
Projected Expenses $1,630,344.00
History and Background
Former Names
NameYear
N/A
Year Founded 1946
IRS Ruling Year 1948
State Registration Expiration Mar 2015
Statements
Mission To assist African Americans, other minorities, and the poor, to achieve social and economic equality.
Background The Urban League of Greater Oklahoma City (ULOKC) is an affiliate of the National Urban League and a United Way agency partner. Founded in 1946, ULOKC's mission is to assist African Americans, other minorities and the poor to achieve social and economic equality.

Serving more than 10,000 clients annually in central Oklahoma ULOKC works to accomplish its mission through jobs, education, housing, and supportive services.
Impact Over its seventy year history, the Urban League of Greater Oklahoma City (ULOKC) has addressed the needs of African Americans, other minorities, and the poor in the Oklahoma City metropolitan area. The Urban League of Greater Oklahoma City has maintained its 501(c) 3 nonprofit tax status since 1946.Since its inception, the Urban League of Greater Oklahoma City has implemented five core programs. By analyzing community conditions and surveying program participants, the ULOKC has identified unmet needs which include services that promote and prepare individuals for economic self-reliance through access to housing, education and employment opportunities. The ULOKC has served the Oklahoma City metropolitan area and specifically the northeast community of Oklahoma City, consistently addressing the issue of poverty facing African Americans and other demographic groups.Organized by principal programmatic areas to operationalize those strategies, the ULOKC directly operates affordable housing programs, health promotion, educational programs, workforce training, and postsecondary initiatives touching some 10,000 people annually through an array of direct services, special events, specific opportunities (e.g., homebuyer education), and on-going programs.The agency also supports other more specialized access opportunities through partnerships with area vocational technical schools, community colleges, small businesses and corporations, and faith-based institutions.The ULOKC has developed a strong network of integrated social service, economic development, community health, educational, and social enterprise resources in Oklahoma City for the purposes of helping people in poverty address its consequences and exit such a life compromising situation.
Needs
1.  $10,000 to support food for program participants
2.  $10,000 to support after-school program staff
3.  $10,000 to support parent information center education 
CEO/Executive Director Statement

"The Urban League of Greater Oklahoma City is dedicated to improving the lives of our clients. We have four program areas: Workforce and Career Development, Education and Family Development, Housing and Financial Literacy, Community Convening and Social Justice. With our extensive program capabilities, we are an excellent resource for those who seek opportunities to move beyond poverty to prosperity." -Dr. Valerie Thompson

Area Served
Area Served
Geographic Area Served
Central Oklahoma
The Urban League of Greater Oklahoma City (ULOKC) works with high need populations in Greater Oklahoma City and reaches African American people living in the city’s six highest need zip codes that are characterized by poverty and diminished infrastructure.  By virtue of its location,  the ULOKC addresses entrenched poverty and among its several principal strategies of assistance is vocational development and employment of people who experience structural displacement from job markets.
Service Categories
Secondary Organizational Category Employment/Job Training
Tertiary Organizational Category Education/Educational Services
Programs
Description
The Urban League’s Education and Family Development department focuses on education and family services for students that attend high poverty, low performing schools.
 
Priorities include:
  • School Age Care & Learning Center– tutoring and homework assistance for pre-K through sixth-grade students to improve reading skills and overall academic performance.
  • Perfecting Education for Kids (PEAK)- a five-year 21st Century Community Learning Center program at Centennial Mid-High School. PEAK provides out-of-school hours educational services focused on college readiness, character development, parental training and cultural enrichment.  
  • Enrichment Academies/Mentoring –Youth living in high-poverty areas participate in college readiness, mentoring, leadership development, financial literacy and community service.
  • Supportive Services– support services, i.e. utility assistance, food vouchers, etc., are provided to families of students enrolled in after school programs.
Strategy
Population Served K-12 (5-19 years) Poor,Economically Disadvantaged,Indigent Families
Program Short-term SuccessHelpDescription of short-term achievement(s) or improvement(s) that will result from this program. Students who receive 182 hours of mentoring activities, 90% will achieve their academic, behavior, and attendance requirements to promote to the next grade or graduate. 60% of the students enrolled in the PEAK program will attend 30 or more tutoring sessions and 40% will score satisfactory or above on reading and math proficiency exams. Children in poverty will receive school supplies and services and participate in a health day that engages them in purposeful play while promoting muscle and bone strengthening, healthy eating, body coordination and health literacy. Students will obtain Science, Technology, Engineering, Art, and Math (STEAM) connection to providers, and resources to promote STEAM academic improvement and STEAM career awareness. PK-6th grade students who participate in tutoring, reading, math enrichment activities, and STEAM projects during non-school hours (afterschool, winter, fall, summer and spring breaks), 75% will maintain positive attendance.
Program Long-term SuccessHelpDescription of the ultimate change(s) that will result from this program. This may be far into the future or represent an ideal state. The ULOKC Education and Family Development program will improve academic performance by incorporating staff who engages students in positive interaction and enriching activities to boost student achievement. ULOKC Education and Family Development program includes mentoring as a component of the homework and tutoring assistance. Staff provides guidance, answers questions, offers encouragement, and transfer knowledge and experiences in areas of communication, critical thinking, responsibility and teamwork. The Education and Family Development program is a unique and comprehensive approach to addressing the academic, personal and social needs of African American youth. The components to the program are designed to develop an individual student’s knowledge and attitudes toward academic success. The program integrates academic preparation for post-secondary success along with life-skills development, personal, global, and cultural awareness.
Program Success MonitoringHelpDescription of the tools used to measure or track program impact. Student grades; attendance records, and state test scores will be assessed to determine the individual level of student improvement. Program group results will be compared with a sample group of students in the target population that did not participate in ULOKC Education and Family Development programs. ULOKC will undergo monitoring of the 21st Century Community Learning Center (CCLC) grant as required by the United States Department of Education (USDE) and is an element of the Oklahoma 21st CCLC Evaluation System. The Oklahoma 21st CCLC SEA will monitor ULOKC through desk monitoring, auditing of reimbursement claims, site visits, and monitoring visits. The monitoring tool was designed by USDE to incorporate both federal and state regulations, as well as essential elements of quality programming.
Examples of Program SuccessHelpSpecific examples of changes in behaviors or testimonies of changes that demonstrate program success. Research found that two of the most important practices distinguishing high-retention programs were ample leadership, opportunities for youth and high levels of staff efforts to keep informed about participants well-being outside the programs. ULOKC’s mentoring programs are based on research that there is a fundamental need for programs administered during the out-of-school time. These programs provide useful methods to pre-assess student's skills, interests, and commitment as they enter the program, and to monitor academic and social growth. ULOKC integrated the Project Ready (PR) curriculum into the program more than 3 years ago and the Academy of Educational Development (AEDI), a national evaluation of PR highlighted the impressive impact on the program's curriculum on students’ lives and families throughout the National Urban League movement.
Description The Disparity: The unemployment rate for Oklahoma City is 5 percent, but for African-Americans, the rate jumps to 11.9 percent.
Bridging the Gap: The Urban League Workforce and Career Development department specializes in locating employment for individuals who are the hardest to employ or are underemployed.

EMPLOY – (Empowering People and Linking Occupations to You) is a bi-weekly job readiness training program featuring guest employers. Clients are connected to employers with job openings and trained in resume preparation, interviewing techniques and job search activities.

ReEntry Employment - employment and training services are offered to ex-offenders in high poverty, high crime areas. Services include job readiness training, mentoring and connecting participants to housing and substance abuse and mental health treatment.

Career and College Expo - The annual event connects employers to a diverse population of applicants, creating opportunities for viable employment.
Strategy
Population Served At-Risk Populations Blacks, African Heritage General/Unspecified
Program Short-term SuccessHelpDescription of short-term achievement(s) or improvement(s) that will result from this program. ULOKC Workforce and Career Development staff will host and/or participate in various events and activities to connect 2600 job seeking clients to employers, job training, financial management, and career advancement opportunities. ULOKC will conduct technology based job training sessions and participants will attend EMPLOY. 60% of participants that attend an EMPLOY session will obtain employment or education enrollment; 80% of those participants that achieve employment will achieve 90 day retention, advance in their careers and/or increase wages.
Program Long-term SuccessHelpDescription of the ultimate change(s) that will result from this program. This may be far into the future or represent an ideal state. According to the Pew Research Center, labor economists, sociologists and other researchers have offered many explanations for the persistent 2-to-1 gap from the differing industrial distribution of black and white workers to a skills gap between them. Without the Urban League's intervention in reducing the unemployment rate within the African American community, the unemployment rate for African Americans in Oklahoma would exceed the 11.9% that currently exists. Our aim is to reduce the unemployment rate for African Americans in OKC to less than 10% (2-to-1 ratio) which is lower than most urban cities.
Program Success MonitoringHelpDescription of the tools used to measure or track program impact. Overall our program results are verified by the success rate of the number of individuals who obtain and maintain employment 90 days or more. However, intermediary results can be measured by the number of individuals who successfully complete a resume that will potentially lead to a job and the number of employment clients who successfully gain a new skill to seek employment. Our employment rate success is verified by the Oklahoma Security Commission Local Employment Dynamics reports and the U.S. Department of Labor statistics.
Examples of Program SuccessHelpSpecific examples of changes in behaviors or testimonies of changes that demonstrate program success. The ULOKC program model leverages best practices and lessons learned documented by the Academy for Educational Development in Turnaround Strategies for Youth At-Risk: Lessons from the Evaluation of Urban Youth Empowerment Program (UYEP), an evaluation of the first generation UYEP. These practices include a focus on strategic partnerships with employers and public and not-profit organizations that bring educational and workforce related opportunities; effective hiring of strong, committed program staff; careful attention to the mental health and substance use service needs of participants, and linkages to effective services; an emphasis on peer-based systems of outreach and support for program participants; and high quality mentoring opportunities. We also utilize the Oklahoma career pathways model to develop talent pipelines for clients to identify ecosystems and industry sectors with the most potential for employment opportunities.
Description The Disparity: In Oklahoma City, minorities make up 33 percent of the population, but own 18 percent of the businesses.

Bridging the Gap: The entrepreneurship department works to enhance economic development and growth of minority-owned businesses.

Seminars and Workshops – small business start up workshops and webinars are offered free of charge to the community. Series topics include: basic steps to starting a business, how to write a business plan, getting out of debt, and securing business loans.

Business Counseling - one-on-one counseling is provided to minority entrepreneurs in areas such as business registration, acquiring tax identification, establishment of business structure, business and marketing plan development and loan packaging assistance.
Strategy
Population Served Minorities Adults General/Unspecified
Program Short-term SuccessHelpDescription of short-term achievement(s) or improvement(s) that will result from this program. ULOKC will provide financial literacy education in the form of workshops and online individuals and small business owners. ULOKC will require clients to access an in-house computer and review a 5-10 video about financial literacy prior to receiving services. The videos will also be played at group workshops and linked to ULOKC website. The financial literacy program was developed by Bank of America and the Khan Academy. ULOKC will provide referrals to other organizations who can provide more detailed assistance once clients have obtain entry level financial literacy education.
Program Long-term SuccessHelpDescription of the ultimate change(s) that will result from this program. This may be far into the future or represent an ideal state. When families obtain financial literacy they are able to forecast and plan for financial growth. By teaching financial literacy, we are helping create jobs through new minority entrepreneurship and expand minority entrepreneurship. We allow clients the ability to focus their attentions on obtaining the services their family needs to achieve economic self-reliance through financial literacy. These services strengthen the family unit and provide a way to lessen or eliminate the effects of poverty.
Program Success MonitoringHelpDescription of the tools used to measure or track program impact. We will know if program results are achieved based on a large sample of the answers to workshop and phone surveys. Within those clients we will track data on the number of new businesses; existing businesses; number of loans obtained; number of jobs created and retained; and feedback received on needed services.
Examples of Program SuccessHelpSpecific examples of changes in behaviors or testimonies of changes that demonstrate program success. Our team uses a "readiness and education" approach to the implementing the program. The positive effects of educating small businesses are verified in the follow publication: http://www.joe.org/joe/2000december/a4.php.
Description
The Disparity: In Oklahoma City, home ownership rates for African Americans is below the city’s average. The same is true when comparing the median home valve. Barriers to increasing African American home ownership include lack of affordable housing in distressed neighborhoods and citizens who are not mortgage ready due to poor credit, limited income and no savings.
 
Bridging the Gap: The Urban League’s approach to this disparity includes home buyer education and increasing affordable housing.

Home Buyer Education – educational seminars by real estate and mortgage professionals are provided to low-moderate income families (particularly African-Americans). The curriculum covers money management, credit issues, mortgages, budgeting, home maintenance and avoiding foreclosure.

Affordable Housing Construction - in the early 2000’s, the Urban League began new home construction and rehabilitation to bring more affordable, quality housing to northeast Oklahoma City.
Strategy
Population Served Families Aging, Elderly, Senior Citizens At-Risk Populations
Program Short-term SuccessHelpDescription of short-term achievement(s) or improvement(s) that will result from this program. ULOKC will continue to manage, lease and maintain our multifamily and single family homes to insure our properties are safe, meet the quality we demand and the affordability requirements set forth in the LIHTC or HOME fund regulations. ULOKC strives to provide quality affordable housing to the families we serve while encouraging them to strive for economic self-reliance. By teaching financial literacy, we are helping to eliminate their concern for safe, affordable housing. We allow clients the ability to focus their attentions on obtaining the services their family needs to achieve economic self-reliance through housing and financial literacy. These services strengthen the family unit and provide a way to lessen or eliminate the effects of poverty.
Program Long-term SuccessHelpDescription of the ultimate change(s) that will result from this program. This may be far into the future or represent an ideal state. When a family obtains safe, affordable housing, they can shift their focus to providing other necessities like utilities, food, clothing, health care and the possibility of saving for the future. They can engage in opportunities to strengthen the education and/or training for themselves and their children. They can position themselves where they too can achieve the American dream of home ownership; which ultimately increases family stability and increases personal wealth. ULOKC will continue to manage, lease and maintain our multifamily and single family homes to insure our properties are safe, meet the quality we demand and the affordability requirements set forth in the Low income Housing Tax Credits or HOME fund regulations. ULOKC will provide supporting services such as financial literacy, credit counseling, safety & drug awareness, food & nutrition classes and home buyer education.
Program Success MonitoringHelpDescription of the tools used to measure or track program impact. We will know if program results are achieved based on a large sample of the answers to workshop and phone surveys. If the properties maintain a vacancy rate of 1-5%, this indicates the need and success of the maintenance and management of the property. All supporting services are verified by attendance, in-class participation and surveys conducted at the end of each workshop.
Examples of Program SuccessHelpSpecific examples of changes in behaviors or testimonies of changes that demonstrate program success. Our efforts have resulted in construction of 11 new single-family homes and four rehabilitated homes for low-income families. In 2009, construction was completed on 36 multi-family duplexes located on northeast 26th and Laird and a 60-unit senior residence at northeast 30th and Kelley in partnership with the Greater Mt. Olive Baptist Church. Both developments are estimated to generate an annual economic impact of more than $2.5 million for the northeast Oklahoma City area. An additional 8 homes have been remodeled and provided for low-income families.
Description
The Disparity:Statistics from the Oklahoma Department of Health show that African-Americans have the highest mortality rate in Oklahoma and lead in the categories of heart disease, cancer and stroke. African-Americans have the state’s second highest diabetes mortality rate. Factors that lead to this disparity include limited financial resources for preventative health care and mistrust of public services.
 
Bridging the Gap:The urban health department works to engage African-Americans in preventative health activities to increase life expectancy and early detection and treatment.

Education and Outreach – educational seminars and screenings are offered to the African American community with an emphasis on diseases where African-Americans are at high risk including diabetes, heart disease and breast cancer. Through various partnerships with the health care industry the Urban League is working to encourage  healthy lifestyle choices and fitness activities.

Strategy
Population Served Families At-Risk Populations Minorities
Program Short-term SuccessHelpDescription of short-term achievement(s) or improvement(s) that will result from this program. Children in poverty will engage in purposeful play while promoting muscle and bone strengthening, healthy eating, body coordination and health literacy. Our health promotion program provides health screenings and culturally sensitive preventative health materials to clients at our annual Back to School Bash Health Fair and African American Women’s Health Forum.
Program Long-term SuccessHelpDescription of the ultimate change(s) that will result from this program. This may be far into the future or represent an ideal state. African Americans in Oklahoma have the highest mortality rate (more deaths) and lead the state in the categories of heart disease, cancer, and stroke. Non-Hispanic Blacks and Non-Hispanic American Indian adults experience more mentally unhealthy days within 30 days than Whites and Hispanics. Blacks die from cancer at a higher rate than any other race in Oklahoma. Black females have the highest age-adjusted death rate due to breast cancer and Black males have the highest prostate cancer adjusted death rates. Blacks have the highest stoke age-adjusted death rates than any other race in Oklahoma. Lastly, Blacks have the highest homicide age-adjusted death rate which is 5 times higher than Whites in Oklahoma races. Through providing continuous education and preventive healthcare, the Urban League will bring awareness to these issues and encourage healthier lifestyles to the community and save lives within the African American community.
Program Success MonitoringHelpDescription of the tools used to measure or track program impact. Our staff provides health educational materials and work with health providers to conduct screenings. After each screening, a client is provided a survey to determine the level of increase health knowledge and the potential for the individual to improve lifestyles to change health behaviors. The results of the surveys are used to determine gaps in service, assess delivery of program services, identify additional community partnerships and monitor health trends as they relate to African Americans and low income individuals. If the trend data suggests a change in health educations or screenings, staff will work with our health partners to make the appropriate adjustments.
Examples of Program SuccessHelpSpecific examples of changes in behaviors or testimonies of changes that demonstrate program success. Research conducted by Russell and Jewell on the challenges for improving the health of African Americans, noted that the reasons for the health discrepancies among African Americans are multifaceted and complex. They also suggested that in the African American population, culture appears to play a major role in health-care practices and health beliefs. A study conducted Jens Ludwig published in the New England Journal of Medicine found that the concentration of poverty is not only bad policy but it is bad for one’s health. The study found that the availability of healthier foods is worse in lower-income neighborhoods. Opportunities for physical exercise are scarcer. There are fewer doctors’ offices and other medical services. Long-term stress of living in such an environment may alter hormones that control weight.
CEO/Executive Director
CEO/Executive Director Dr. Valerie Thompson
Start Date May 1993
Email vrthompson@urbanleagueok.org
Experience Since 1999, Dr. Valerie Thompson has served as the second female president and CEO for the Urban League of Greater Oklahoma City in the affiliate’s 70 year history. She provides strong leadership and ambition for the Urban League, working to further its mission to assist African Americans, other minorities and the poor achieve social and economic equality. Dr. Thompson is also a passionate advocate for issues that affect the underserved by serving on local and national boards such as the Governor’s Workforce and Education Council, ½ billion dollars City of OKC MAPS Metropolitan Area Public Schools Trust, the City of OKC MAPS 3 Seniors Health and Wellness Committee and the Oklahoma City Public Schools Foundation Board. Dr. Thompson was also recognized as The Journal Record’s 2011 Oklahoma Most Admired CEO in the category of nonprofits under $10 million and the 2013 Oklahoma Nonprofit Excellence (ONE) Award finalist. Dr. Thompson was recently presented with the National Association of Social Workers, Oklahoma chapter 2015 Public Citizen of the Year award, 2015 National Urban League Woman of Power Award, and was recognized by the Journal Record’s as one of “50 Making a Difference” Woman of the Year honorees. Dr. Thompson was also presented with the 2016 Oklahoma State University Black Alumni Association Trailblazer award. In addition to her numerous accolades, Dr. Thompson also serves as a member of Rotary International, President of the Association of Executives for the National Urban League and as a member of the National Urban League Trustees. Dr. Thompson received a doctorate in political science and a master’s of business administration from the University of Oklahoma. She also has a bachelor’s degree in business administration from Oklahoma State University.
Senior Staff
NameTitle
Shani Nealy, MHRSr. VP Administration
Lonnetta Smith, MBAAssoc VP Education and Workforce
Staff
Number of Full-time Staff 13
Number of Part-time Staff 28
Number of Contract Staff 0
Number of Volunteers 168
Are professional development opportunities provided? Yes
Does CEO/Executive Director have formal evaluations? Yes
Management reports to board? Yes
Staff Demographics - Ethnicity
African American/Black 31
Caucasian 10
Organizational Plans
Fundraising Plan Yes
Policy against commission-based compensation for fundraising consultant No
Communication Plan Yes
Strategic Plan Yes
Number of Years Strategic Plan Considers 3
Date Strategic Plan Adopted Jan 2011
Management Succession Plan Yes
Organization Policies and Procedures Yes
Affiliations
AffiliationYear
United Way of Central Oklahoma member agency1947
Awards
Awards
Award/RecognitionOrganizationYear
ONE AwardOklahoma Center for Nonprofits Oklahoma Nonprofit Excellence2013
Most Admired CEOJournal Record2011
Public Citizen AwardNational Association of Social Workers - OK chapter2015
Woman of Power AwardNational Urban League2015
Black Alumni Trailblazer AwardOklahoma State University2016
Risk Management Provisions
Directors and Officers Policy
Professional Liability
Special Event Liability
Terrorism
Workers Compensation and Employers' Liability
Government Licenses
Is your organization licensed by the government (federal, state and/or local)? No
Board Chair
Name Dr. Angie R. Christopher
Company Affiliation Volunteer
Term July 2015 to June 2017
Email christopher.angie04@gmail.com
Board of Directors
List Current as of July 01, 2017
Board of Directors List
NameAffiliationStatus
Cathy Blevins Bank of America Merrill LynchVoting
Angie Christopher Community VolunteerVoting
Matt Clouse Voting
Kristin Greenhaw Sonic Corp and SubsidiariesVoting
Leslie Johnson Arvest BankVoting
Richard Kincade UPSVoting
Rusty LaForge Voting
James Mouton IIIVoting
Myron Pope University of Central OKVoting
Blake Rambo Harold Ham OK DiabetesVoting
Sandra Rochell CMFCBank of OklahomaVoting
Jonathan Rule IntegrisVoting
Matt Sanderson Enterprise HoldingsVoting
Jabar Shumate University of OklahomaVoting
Brandon Slaton DellVoting
Erin Wilcox Cox CommunicationsVoting
Apollo Woods Voting
Board Demographics - Ethnicity
African American/Black 6
Asian American/Pacific Islander 0
Caucasian 13
Hispanic/Latino 0
Native American/American Indian 0
Other 0 1
Board Demographics - Gender
Male 11
Female 9
Governance
Board Term Lengths 3 years
Percentage of Board Making Monetary Contributions to the Organization 100 %
Percentage of Board Making In-Kind Contributions to the Organization 100 %
Board Orientation Yes
Constituency Includes Client Representation No
Written Board Selection Criteria? Yes
Standing Committees
Audit
Board Development / Board Orientation
By-laws
Communications / Promotion / Publicity / Public Relations
Development / Fund Development / Fund Raising / Grant Writing / Major Gifts
Executive
Finance
Housing and Community Development
Special Events (Golf Tournament, Walk / Run, Silent Auction, Dinner / Gala)
Strategic Planning / Strategic Direction
Volunteer
Current Fiscal Year
Fiscal Year July 01, 2016-June 30, 2017
Current Year Budgeted Total Income $1,634,500
Current Year Budgeted Total Expenses $1,630,344
Financial Documents
Audit2016
Audit2015
Audit2014
Audit2013
Audit2012
Audit2011
Audit2010
Audit2009
IRS Letter of Determination
Prior Three Years' Financial History
Revenue and ExpensesHelpFinancial data for prior years is entered by foundation staff based on the documents submitted by nonprofit organizations.Foundation staff members enter this information to assure consistency in the presentation of financial data across all organizations.
Fiscal Year201620152014
Total Revenue$1,486,262$1,908,368$1,795,884
Total Expenses$1,576,831$1,829,689$1,764,380
Revenue Less Expenses($90,569)$78,679$31,504
Revenue SourcesHelpThe financial analysis involves a comparison of the IRS Form 990 and the audit report (when available) and revenue sources may not sum to total based on reconciliation differences. Revenue from foundations and corporations may include individual contributions when not itemized separately.
Fiscal Year201620152014
Contributions$381,869$303,547$246,246
Foundation and
Corporation Contributions
------
Government Contributions$545,130$899,882$965,306
Federal------
State------
Local------
Unspecified$545,130$899,882$965,306
Individual Contributions------
$382,500$400,178$398,792
$66,286$148,310$55,631
Investment Income, Net of Losses$2,678$2,771$23,961
Unrealized Gain/Loss($698)($231)$1,273
Membership Dues----$10,055
Special Events$61,480$99,339$64,581
Revenue In-Kind--$7,000$25,738
Other$47,017$47,572$4,301
Expense Allocation
Fiscal Year201620152014
Program Expense$1,255,145$1,500,019$1,195,338
Administration Expense$272,754$290,769$510,422
Fundraising Expense$48,932$38,901$58,620
Payments to Affiliates------
Total Revenue/Total Expenses0.941.041.02
Program Expense/Total Expenses80%82%68%
Fundraising Expense/Contributed Revenue5%3%4%
Assets and Liabilities
Fiscal Year201620152014
Total Assets$1,414,147$1,535,882$1,382,132
Current Assets$49,862$51,267$134,199
Long-Term Liabilities$275,893$242,143$192,543
Current Liabilities$123,620$188,536$163,065
Total Net Assets$1,014,634$1,105,203$1,026,524
Solvency
Short Term Solvency
Fiscal Year201620152014
Current Ratio: Current Assets/Current Liabilities0.400.270.82
Long Term Solvency
Fiscal Year201620152014
Long-Term Liabilities/Total Assets20%16%14%
Funding Sources
Top Funding Sources
Fiscal Year201620152014
Top Funding Source & Dollar AmountGovt - Unspecified $545,130Govt - Unspecified $899,882Govt - Unspecified $965,306
Second Highest Funding Source & Dollar AmountIndirect Public Support $382,500Indirect Public Support $400,178Indirect Public Support $398,792
Third Highest Funding Source & Dollar AmountContributions $381,869Contributions $303,547Contributions $246,246
Endowment? Yes
Endowment Spending Policy N/A
Endowment Spending Policy Percentage (if selected) 5 %
Credit Line? Yes
Reserve Fund? No
Capital Campaign
Currently in a Capital Campaign? No
Comments on Financials
CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments
One of our largest challenges is obtaining unrestricted funds used to support the day to day operations of our organization. The majority of our funding (grant & foundation) are line item restricted to support direct program services. 
Foundation Staff Comments
Fiscal year 2016, 2015 financial summary are per the organization's IRS Form 990. Fiscal 2014 is from audited financial statements. Therefore, you may see some discrepancies in the breakout of revenue, expenses, totals assets and/or net assets going from the audited financials to the Form 990s.

Contributions may include foundations and corporations when the breakout was not available.

The financial information presented is obtained from the following sources: IRS Form 990, independent audit reports, financial statements – board approved when available, and supplemental information from the organization. We do not warrant or guarantee the timeliness, errors or inaccuracies. With respect to information regarding financial performance, nothing on this website should be interpreted as a statement or interpretation by OCCF staff.

Organizations with a GiveSmartOKC profile are responsible for updating information annually within 45 days following the end of their fiscal year.
Address 3900 N Martin Luther King Ave
Oklahoma City, OK 73111 5220
Primary Phone 405 424-5243 112
Give with Credit Card http://urbanleagueok.org/donate/
Give to Endowment http://occf.org/ulokc/
CEO/Executive Director Dr. Valerie Thompson
Board Chair Dr. Angie R. Christopher
Board Chair Company Affiliation Volunteer

 

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